recall

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recall

 
1. (re-kawl´) to remember or recollect.
2. (re´kawl) the process of bringing information back into consciousness.

re·call

(rē'kawl),
The process of remembering thoughts, words, and actions of a past event in an attempt to recapture actual happenings.

recall

Medical devices
noun The retiring of a device from the medical marketplace or suspension of its approval pending investigation or addressing of a defect.

Medspeak-UK
verb To request—usually by letter—that a woman return for a repeat cervical screening test, which is done in 3- or 5-year cycles under the NHS Cervical Screening Programme.

Neurology
noun The process of bringing a memory into consciousness; the recollection of past facts, events, feeling; invoking the memory of experiences or learned information.

verb To remember experiences or learned information.

Public health
noun A public announcement by a manufacturer or producer of a particular product—e.g., motor vehicles, toys, drugs, medical devices, foods—asking the purchaser of a particular product or model to return the goods as they may have defects posing a health hazard; the collecting by a manufacturer of a product that has been deemed unsafe, or otherwise unsuitable, after being sold or available for sale to the public.

recall

Neurology nounpronounced ree CALL The process of bringing a memory into consciousness; the recollection of past facts, events, feelings; invoking of the memory of experiences or learned information verbpronounced ricall To remember experiences or learned information. See Class recall, Immediate recall, Memory Public health noun–pronounced REE call, drug recallA public announcement by a manufacturer or producer of a particular product–eg, motor vehicles, toys, drugs, medical devices, foods, asking the purchaser of a particular 'lot, ' or model to return the goods as they may have defects posing a health hazard.

re·call

(rē'kawl)
1. The process of remembering thoughts, words, and actions of a past event in an attempt to recapture actual happenings.
2. To remove a product (e.g., drug) from use due to possible safety issues with the product.

recall,

n the procedure of advising or reminding a patient to have his oral health reviewed or reexamined; an important phase of preventive dentistry. Term is being replaced by
preventive maintenance appointment.

recall

a voluntary action of removing a product from retail or distribution by a manufacturer or distributor to protect the public from products that may cause health problems.
References in periodicals archive ?
If you want one memory to represent flat then only one easily recallable memory remains.
The time and costs were even less for the fabrication of the second, third, and tertiary iterations of the same handle design, since all of the previous work was stored in a readily recallable Computer Aided Machining--CAM--program," Ko said.
Consequently, Democrats needed to offer an alternative and compelling public philosophy to Reaganism, one that could be captured in a phrase readily recallable by citizens.
Up to 127 movement/ positioning profiles can be stored, recallable via the digital inputs.
As long as the password is still meaningful to the user, a password containing ten characters will be just as recallable for the user as a password of only five characters.
Before there was time to ponder those answers, a third ghost appeared, its image the faintest of all, barely recognizable or recallable by all but the oldest shoppers out there: Best & Co.
The recycling rates represents the ratio of the weights of steel, copper and other recallable parts and materials taken from disposed appliances to the total weights of the appliances.
And unlike some local country club memberships, Premier memberships at University Park are not recallable.
Judgments of learning (JOL) occur during or after acquisition and are predictors of future test performance on currently recallable items (Nelson, 1992, 1996b; Nelson & Narens, 1990; Reder & Ritter, 1992).