rebuttal

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rebuttal

(ri-bŭt′ăl)
In law, evidence or testimony that contradicts or sheds doubt upon the assertions of the opposing party in a dispute.
rebut (ri-bŭt′)
References in periodicals archive ?
However, it is up the employer and/or its Workers' Compensation Insurance carrier to rebut the presumption.
Japan's industry ministry will include arguments on auto and steel market practices when the government rebuts a recent U.
The flap was touched off by a suit by columnist and Chavez critic Elias Santana, who demanded time to rebut what he said were attacks on him made by Chavez during his radio show, carried on state-owned networks.
The absence of many of these factors may rebut the presence of a device.
If the defendant pleads self-defense in court, prosecutors may choose to introduce booking photographs in court to rebut such claims.
And frankly, when you're dealing with a country that doesn't have infinite resources, that's a very difficult argument to, rebut.
No such letter has been issued from minister office and we not only disown it but also rebut it", the statement issued by the commerce ministry said.
Why doesn't someone in the GOP rebut Clinton's ad about Proposition 87, with the fact that Brazil has a law requiring all gas stations in Brazil to carry all three fuels: gas, alcohol and diesel.
While prosecutors point out that the law affords defendants a right to rebut the charges, O'Flaherty says that won't cut it in his courtroom.
IN response to the letter from Dave Loudon, Chairman, Mersey Tunnels Users Association (ECHO Letters Nov 8), I am writing to rebut his claims that no-one from the Wirral will benefit from the tram in Liverpool.
Three tests: Second, pre-AJCA, certain dual residents could rebut the presumption of a principal purpose of tax avoidance by requesting an IRS ruling.
Although a SCIN between family members is presumed to be a gift rather than a bona fide transaction, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals recently overturned a Tax Court ruling, indicating a taxpayer may rebut this presumption by showing that at the time of the transaction he or she had a real expectation of repayment and intended to enforce collection of the indebtedness.