rebound tenderness


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Related to rebound tenderness: Rovsing sign, Murphy's sign

tenderness

 [ten´der-nes]
a state of unusual sensitivity to touch or pressure.
rebound tenderness
1. a state in which pain is felt on the release of pressure over a part.
2. specifically, such a sensation in the abdomen, considered a sign of peritonitis. It is sometimes used to test for peritonitis; this procedure is controversial because of the pain involved.

re·bound ten·der·ness

tenderness percured when pressure, particularly pressure on the abdomen, is suddenly released.

rebound tenderness

a sign of inflammation of the peritoneum in which increased pain is elicited by the sudden release of the fingertips pressing on the abdomen. Most examiners check for rebound tenderness in the quadrant opposite the area of pain. One hand is used, with the fingers placed perpendicular to the plane of the abdomen. The area of pain may be diffuse or relatively sharply circumscribed. See also appendical reflex, peritonitis.
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Testing for rebound tenderness

rebound tenderness

Clinical medicine The presence of pain that is more intense when the examiner releases pressure when palpating the abdomen

Blum·berg sign

(blūm'berg sīn)
Pain felt on sudden release of steadily applied pressure on a suspected area of the abdomen, indicative of peritonitis.
Synonym(s): rebound tenderness.

rebound tenderness

A clinical sign of inflammation somewhere in the intestine, as in APPENDICITIS. Gentle but increasing pressure is applied to the front of the abdomen, remote from the suspected site, and then suddenly released. A definite pain, felt in another part of the abdomen suggests disease there.

tenderness

a state of unusual sensitivity to touch or pressure.

rebound tenderness
a state in which pain is felt on the release of pressure over a part.
References in periodicals archive ?
Key Words: rebound tenderness, appendicitis, peritoneum, McBurney's point
Rebound tenderness, a widely used physical examination test for patients with suspected appendicitis, can be quite uncomfortable for the patient.
Our pinch-an-inch test is essentially a form of rebound tenderness, only in reverse.
On serial examinations by both the senior resident and the attending level surgeons and emergency medicine physicians, there was no rebound tenderness by the classic technique (gradually pressing over the right lower quadrant for about 15 seconds and then quickly withdrawing the hand with a positive test occurring when the patient reports increased pain as the hand is removed).
Specifically, there was no rebound tenderness by the classic technique.
7,8) Although rebound tenderness is a widely used examination technique for detecting peritonitis, (1,2,9) it is quite uncomfortable and can be inaccurate, despite serial examinations.
To illustrate the difference between our pinch-an-inch test and classic rebound tenderness, consider the difference between putting a golf ball (ie, classic rebound) and dropping a golf ball (ie, pinch-an-inch).
The pain was not significantly worsened with palpation, and the patient did not have any rebound tenderness.
On abdominal examination she was tender to palpation in the right groin and guarding and rebound tenderness were absent in the right iliac fossa.
Physical examination revealed a distended rigid abdomen, with involuntary guarding and generalized rebound tenderness.