rebound phenomenon


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Related to rebound phenomenon: pronator drift

re·bound phe·nom·e·non

1. Synonym(s): Stewart-Holmes sign
2. generally, any phenomenon in which a variable that has been displaced from its normal state by a disturbing influence temporarily deviates from normal in the opposite direction when the disturbing influence is suddenly removed, before finally stabilizing at its normal state, that is, a phenomenon involving undershoot; for example, the subsequent hypoglycemia that may follow injection of glucose, because the initial hyperglycemia caused excessive secretion of insulin.

rebound phenomenon

Etymology: OFr, rebondir + Gk, phainomenon, anything seen
a renewal of reflex activity after the stimulus that triggered the original action has been removed. It may be indicative of a lesion of the cerebellum.

re·bound phe·nom·e·non

(rē'bownd fĕ-nom'ĕ-non)
1. Synonym(s): Stewart-Holmes sign.
2. Generally, any phenomenon in which a variable that has been displaced from its normal state by a disturbing influence temporarily deviates from normal in the opposite direction when the disturbing influence is suddenly removed, before finally stabilizing at its normal state.

rebound phenomenon

The inability to prevent large over-shoot movements of a limb when resistance to strong muscle contraction is suddenly removed. This is a sign of cerebellar dysfunction.

Stewart,

Thomas Grainger, English neurologist, 1877-1957.
Stewart-Holmes sign - in cerebellar disease, the inability to check a movement when passive resistance is suddenly released. Synonym(s): rebound phenomenon
References in periodicals archive ?
Role of heparin rebound phenomenon in the pathogenesis of acute right ventricle myocardial infarction "in extension.
The pathophysiology of this rebound phenomenon is poorly understood.
Thus, this PAI-1 increase may reflect a common, drug-independent reaction to thrombolytic infusion, which supports the hypothesis of an antifibrinolytic rebound phenomenon of the organism after thrombolytic therapy [18].