reasonable accommodations

A standard of providing for a worker’s or customer’s needs, as mandated by the Americans with Disabilities Act, which requires that a business make appropriate changes in the environment to accommodate those with mental or physical disabilities as long as such changes do not create an undue burden to the employer

reasonable accommodations

A standard of providing for a worker's or customer's needs, as mandated by the ADA, which requires that a business make appropriate changes in the environment to accommodate those with mental or physical disabilities as long as such changes do not create an undue–financial–burden to the employer. See Americans with Disabilities Act, Architectural barriers, Disability, Handicap.
References in periodicals archive ?
WHEREAS, the refusal to make reasonable accommodations in rules, policies, practices or services when such accommodations may be necessary to afford a person with a disability the equal opportunity to use and enjoy a dwelling is a prohibited form of discrimination under the Act; and
The employer's alleged conduct, EEOC contends, violates Title I of ADA, requiring employers to provide reasonable accommodations unless to do so would impose an undue hardship.
It requires employers to supply reasonable accommodations to employees with disabilities and imposes accessibility requirements on all public facilities and services.
The Fair Housing Act makes it unlawful to refuse to make reasonable accommodations in policies or practices when a person with adisability requires such an accommodation, including refusing to grant waivers to no-pet policies for persons who use assistance or support animals.
The Americans with Disabilities Act tasks employers with providing reasonable accommodations to employees with disabilities to allow them to perform the essential functions of the job.
Examples of reasonable accommodations include: bathroom breaks; leave for a period of disability arising from childbirth; breaks to facilitate increased water intake; periodic rest for those who stand for long periods of time; and assistance with manual labor.
Reasonable accommodations are adjustments or modifications provided by an employer to enable people with disabilities to enjoy equal employment opportunities.
alleging that the county violated the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) when it refused to hire a qualified applicant for a children's social services position because she is deaf and required reasonable accommodations.
Although, in some instances, agencies may use their appropriations to pay for reasonable accommodations under the Rehabilitation Act even though the agency's appropriation otherwise may not be used for that purpose, we do not find that to be the case here.
Finally, the article offers practical guidance on how judge advocates should advise commanders and supervisors on employee issues arising from requests for reasonable accommodations.
Examples of reasonable accommodations include things such as a screen magnifier for a person with a visual impairment, a regularly scheduled lunch hour for a person with diabetes, or flex time for a person who needs to attend required medical appointments.