reasonable accommodations

A standard of providing for a worker’s or customer’s needs, as mandated by the Americans with Disabilities Act, which requires that a business make appropriate changes in the environment to accommodate those with mental or physical disabilities as long as such changes do not create an undue burden to the employer

reasonable accommodations

A standard of providing for a worker's or customer's needs, as mandated by the ADA, which requires that a business make appropriate changes in the environment to accommodate those with mental or physical disabilities as long as such changes do not create an undue–financial–burden to the employer. See Americans with Disabilities Act, Architectural barriers, Disability, Handicap.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to the monetary relief, InsideUp agreed to significant injunctive relief, including, but not limited to, training all its employees; revising its anti-discrimination and retaliation policies and procedures; centrally tracking requests for reasonable accommodations as well as complaints of discrimination and/or retaliation; regularly reporting to the EEOC; and posting a notice about the consent decree and settlement.
Regardless of the term used by the resident, focus on whether the animal is an assistance animal as defined by HUD's guidance and federal law when determining approval of a reasonable accommodations, and do not refer to the animal as a pet.
It requires employers to provide disabled employees or applicants for employment with reasonable accommodations unless doing so would cause an undue hardship.
These reasonable accommodations eliminate barriers that may prevent an individual with SCI/D from being able to perform the necessary functions of the job.
The employer's alleged conduct, EEOC contends, violates Title I of ADA, requiring employers to provide reasonable accommodations unless to do so would impose an undue hardship.
The Americans with Disabilities Act tasks employers with providing reasonable accommodations to employees with disabilities to allow them to perform the essential functions of the job.
Examples of reasonable accommodations include: bathroom breaks; leave for a period of disability arising from childbirth; breaks to facilitate increased water intake; periodic rest for those who stand for long periods of time; and assistance with manual labor.
In the guidance, EEOC officials give mental health care providers advice about their role in clients' efforts to ask employers to make reasonable accommodations at work.
This article will discuss the legal implications of hoarding behavior by providing a general overview of current psychiatric understanding of hoarding disorders, (14) explaining the impact of tenant hoarding on local housing laws and safety concerns, (15) surveying the Fair Housing Act (FHA) reasonable accommodation case law on eviction because of hoarding or other psychiatric disabilities, (16) analyzing how reasonable accommodations can be used to prevent unnecessary evictions and homelessness of this population, (17) and concluding by suggesting the use of collaborative services, such as those provided by local hoarding task forces, in creating reasonable accommodation plans.
Strategic planning for this endeavor is led by the Disability Reasonable Accommodation Division (DRAD), which since its establishment in October 2009 has been the Department's centralized resource for assisting applicants and employees with reasonable accommodations, hiring more persons with disabilities and fostering a more inclusive culture for employees with disabilities.
Reasonable accommodations are adjustments or modifications provided by an employer to enable people with disabilities to enjoy equal employment opportunities.
Although, in some instances, agencies may use their appropriations to pay for reasonable accommodations under the Rehabilitation Act even though the agency's appropriation otherwise may not be used for that purpose, we do not find that to be the case here.