reanimate


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reanimate

(rē-ăn′ĭ-māt) [L. re, again, + animare, fill with life]
To reactivate, restore to life, revive, or resuscitate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ultimately, Martha Washington declined Thornton's offer to reanimate her husband, but not because it seemed too crazy to her.
The researchers are contemplating the use of a similar approach could be used to reanimate other facial features, create an artificial diaphragm to assist breathing, or in replacements fingers and hands.
Just look at the medical advances we've seen in our own lifetime and it's not hard to imagine that future science will be able to reanimate a human being.
UTS's facility will assemble railcars for shipment nationally and internationally, thus helping to reanimate an industry once prominent in Philadelphia as well as to re-establish the region as a corporate headquarters.
Once normal growth conditions are resumed - upon rewarming and reintroduction of oxygen - the organisms will reanimate and go on to live a normal lifespan.
appoint an intervention team to reanimate the horse
of East London) looks at a new strand of Hollywood cinema in the 1990s characterized by an attempt to renegotiate and reanimate the immediacy and affective qualities of the cinematic experience within the commercial media.
The effect is to make one want to go back and see Part I in the light of Part II and then Part II again ad infinitum--not so much to connect the fine points of the plot as to recapture and reanimate the characters.
Playing out in 1970s suburbia, we meet science-obsessed schoolboy Victor Frankenstein who uses an electrical storm to reanimate his bull terrier Sparky after he meets a sticky end under a car.
James's so-called origami is, then, a provisional, unapologetically formalist way to reanimate abstract thought in the space of the gallery.
For example, one focus point will be Amdahl users, leveraging Sun Solaris-based COOL systems to reanimate reports created from the host data warehouse.
Robert Mandan, left, Ken Danzinger, Ray Cooney and Dan Forrest try to reanimate British farce in Cooney's ``Out of Order,'' playing at El Portal Center for the Arts.