reality


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re·al·i·ty

(rē-al'i-tē),
That which exists objectively and in fact, and can be consensually validated.
[L. res, thing, fact]

reality

[rē·al′itē]
Etymology: L, res, factual
the culturally constructed world of perception, meaning, and behavior that members of a culture regard as true.

reality

(rē-al′ĭt-ē)
1. The quality or state of being real or actual.
2. All that exists, as opposed to those ideas or mental images that are imagined.
References in periodicals archive ?
The noeme of photography is therefore not only the expression of a reality, there-it-is, but the superimposition of reality with the past, that-has-been.
Through the instruction of a master, he gains an insight into the "truth of Zen" that involves a radical critique of the ordinary perception of reality.
Reality is constructed within three realms--social, physical, and individual--and is composed of societal definitions and interactions (Charon, 1992, pp.
When the business world first embraces virtual reality, it will likely be for high-level management applications, such as searching databases," says Greg Panos, president of SophisTech Research, a publishing company that specializes in virtual reality.
Armed with a virtual reality helmet, CEOs will be able to enter the world of Bill Agee and look on, spellbound, as he explains where all the money went.
To enhance the sense of reality, some researchers are experimenting with tactile feedback devices (TFDs).
Modern art challenged our perceptions, our reality, and eventually our notion of art itself.
When we consider the bread and the act of eating it in a different context (in the context, say, of our identity as creatures who require constant nourishment to stay alive), we perceive a deeper reality to our physical situations.
REALITY TWO: The sense of entitlement physicians feel--their "doctorness"--is undervalued by management.