reality

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re·al·i·ty

(rē-al'i-tē),
That which exists objectively and in fact, and can be consensually validated.
[L. res, thing, fact]

reality

[rē·al′itē]
Etymology: L, res, factual
the culturally constructed world of perception, meaning, and behavior that members of a culture regard as true.

reality

(rē-al′ĭt-ē)
1. The quality or state of being real or actual.
2. All that exists, as opposed to those ideas or mental images that are imagined.
References in classic literature ?
She obeyed, and as she uttered words they became true in the uttering; as she voiced aspirations they settled into realities.
On one side of the door were the broad daylight and the familiar realities of life.
I had thought, much and often, of my Dora's shadowing out to me what might have happened, in those years that were destined not to try us; I had considered how the things that never happen, are often as much realities to us, in their effects, as those that are accomplished.
You have the realities of happiness; why should you trouble about its theories?
fair no doubt, and worthy well Thy cherishing, thy honouring, and thy love, Not thy subjection: weigh with her thy self; Then value: Oft times nothing profits more Then self-esteem, grounded on just and right Well manag'd; of that skill the more thou know'st, The more she will acknowledge thee her Head, And to realities yeild all her shows; Made so adorn for thy delight the more, So awful, that with honour thou maist love Thy mate, who sees when thou art seen least wise.
Anselmo had with the deepest attention listened to and seen played out the tragedy of the death of his honour, which the performers acted with such wonderfully effective truth that it seemed as if they had become the realities of the parts they played.
Plenty of things in real life are superlatively uninteresting; so that it is one-half of art to select from realities those which contain possibilities of poetry.
Spell-bound and motionless, I could neither speak nor move to avert the impending destruction; and still the noise grew louder, and the King came closer, when I awoke to find the breakfast-bell recalling me to the realities of Flatland.
For an instant he hesitated, and then again there rose before him the dreams of affluence which this great anthropoid would doubtless turn to realities once Paulvitch had landed him safely in some great metropolis like London.