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read

Etymology: AS, raedan, to advise
(of a computer) to retrieve or transfer data from some storage location or medium, such as a disk.

Dick-Read,

Grantley, English physician, 1890-1959.
Read method - psychoprophylactic method of prepared childbirth.
References in classic literature ?
Rebecca rose, overcome with secret laughter dread, and mortification; then in a low voice she read the couplet:--
For myself, at least, I must confess being not always so attentive as I ought to be"(here was a glance at Fanny); "that nineteen times out of twenty I am thinking how such a prayer ought to be read, and longing to have it to read myself.
I read in his countenance what anguish it was to offer that sacrifice to spleen.
By God your worship should read what I have read of Felixmarte of Hircania, how with one single backstroke he cleft five giants asunder through the middle as if they had been made of bean-pods like the little friars the children make; and another time he attacked a very great and powerful army, in which there were more than a million six hundred thousand soldiers, all armed from head to foot, and he routed them all as if they had been flocks of sheep.
That is, I can read poetry and plays, and things of that sort, and do not dislike travels.
It was a Byzantine cistern, which the popular fancy had endowed with fantastic vastness; and the legend which he read told that a boat was always moored at the entrance to tempt the unwary, but no traveller venturing into the darkness had ever been seen again.
Ever since I can remember, the works of Swedenborg formed a large part of his library; he read them much himself, and much to my mother, and occasionally a "Memorable Relation" from them to us children.
For you must remember that she only read it to persuade herself (and me) of its unworthiness, and that the reason she wanted to read the others was to get further proof.
She agreed that it was a great blessing, and expressed herself 'right down thankful for it'; adding, 'If it please God to spare my sight, and make me so as I can read my Bible again, I think I shall be as happy as a queen.
He read on steadily, until he had reached the end of the Second Act.
In 1485, when Morte d'Arthur was first printed, people indeed found it a book "pleasant to read in," and we find it so still.
Read as many as possible of the poems of the authors named.