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read

Etymology: AS, raedan, to advise
(of a computer) to retrieve or transfer data from some storage location or medium, such as a disk.

Dick-Read,

Grantley, English physician, 1890-1959.
Read method - psychoprophylactic method of prepared childbirth.
References in periodicals archive ?
His interesting comments on the style and sense of self in workers' writings ironically underscores the distance between those who wrote and read a lot and the working class as a whole, a separation that persisted even as literacy and the available reading matter increased.
Guests on the long-running BBC Radio 4 show are given a copy of the Bible, the complete works of Shakespeare and a free choice of their own reading matter.
Its function was divided between serving members of parliament (with light reading matter for the train
However, I have found it useful to assign sections of the book as reading matter for a new course on Managing Strategy and Organization Change in Times of Increasing Disorder.
Asked by John Warden what he read regularly, Harris reeled off the required reading matter of any self- respecting Silicon Valley CEO: Wall Street Journal, San Jose Mercury News and occasionally one or more of Forbes, Fortune and Business Week.
Steve Burger and Randy Varney, a dynamic duo with eclectic taste in reading matter, noticed that the latest National Mapping Information published by the U.
In The Business of Enlightenment (1979), Darnton described how respectable publishers in France or just beyond its border sold illicit reading matter through such techniques as "marrying" or "larding" (splicing the pages of, say, Fanny Hill in French in between those of the New Testament).
Tall grasses and broken stones are my only reading matter But to say "This is what I would have you think" Turns the proprietary out of its solo and would suggest Something in the way of a fine line from a Rimbaud letter to
It also furnished much instructive and entertaining incidental information and was greatly appreciated where reading matter was scarce.
Once, the price of reading matter - newspapers, magazines and books - was exempt from state and local sales taxes.
Accounts of persons who had been held captive by Indians provided popular reading matter in colonial times.
The Civil War helped Beadle & Adams attain a huge success, since easy and inexpensive reading matter in dime novels was exactly what the soldiers wanted.