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read

Etymology: AS, raedan, to advise
(of a computer) to retrieve or transfer data from some storage location or medium, such as a disk.

Dick-Read,

Grantley, English physician, 1890-1959.
Read method - psychoprophylactic method of prepared childbirth.
References in periodicals archive ?
The book's "Epilogue" takes up a thread tangential to but no less interesting than the main thesis; it traces a fascinating account of the continued trajectory of Dorastus and Fawnia as reading matter for young people in nineteenth-century Ireland.
His interesting comments on the style and sense of self in workers' writings ironically underscores the distance between those who wrote and read a lot and the working class as a whole, a separation that persisted even as literacy and the available reading matter increased.
Asked by John Warden what he read regularly, Harris reeled off the required reading matter of any self- respecting Silicon Valley CEO: Wall Street Journal, San Jose Mercury News and occasionally one or more of Forbes, Fortune and Business Week.
Looking ahead, he said, "our focus is probably very much more on the reading matter in the newspaper as opposed to the authority of the people who present it.
Steve Burger and Randy Varney, a dynamic duo with eclectic taste in reading matter, noticed that the latest National Mapping Information published by the U.
Tall grasses and broken stones are my only reading matter But to say "This is what I would have you think" Turns the proprietary out of its solo and would suggest Something in the way of a fine line from a Rimbaud letter to
The book is therefore essential reading matter for manufacturing engineers working in the fields mentioned.
With few cheap books and expensive newspapers, reading matter was largely out of the reach of working people.
Many modern bookshelves are multi-purpose, with space to display objects as well as reading matter.
THE Daily Post had been publishing for 24 years and the Education Act of 1870 had spread the levels of literacy - and therefore demand for reading matter - when plans for the launch of the Liverpool Echo were put into action.
Do you pick your reading matter by reputation of the author, because you've read about the book in the papers, heard about it on TV, liked the sound of title, or seen it in the hands of others, intently being read on the train?