reading


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reading

 [rēd´ing]
understanding of written or printed symbols representing words.
lip reading (speech reading) understanding of speech through observation of the speaker's lip movements.

read·ing

(rēd'ing),
1. The perception and understanding of the meaning of visual symbols (for example, letters or words) by the scanning of writing or print with the eyes.
2. Any of several alternative ways of interpreting symbols, such as Braille or the close observation of a speaker's facial movements.

reading

/read·ing/ (rēd´ing) understanding of written or printed symbols representing words.
lip reading , speech reading understanding of speech through observation of the speaker's lip movements.

reading

Etymology: AS, raedan
the linear process in which the genetic information contained in a nucleotide sequence is decoded, as in the translation of the messenger RNA into a sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide.

read·ing

(rēd'ing)
1. The perception and understanding of the meaning of visual symbols (e.g., letters or words) by the scanning of writing or print with the eyes.
2. Any of several alternative ways of interpreting symbols, such as Braille or the close observation of a speaker's facial movements.

reading 

The act of viewing and interpreting letters, words, sentences, etc. It consists of a pattern of eye movements. The eyes proceed along a line in a series of step-like saccades, separated by fixation pauses during which information from the text is acquired. The amount of reading matter correctly identified during the fixation pause is called the span of recognition or the perceptual span. Most saccades are made from left to right, but some occur in the opposite direction (called regression) to return to text recently read but not yet fully perceived. At the end of the line the eyes make a return sweep to the next line of text (Fig. R3). See saccadic eye movement; developmental eye movement test.
Fig. R3 Schematic illustration of eye movements during readingenlarge picture
Fig. R3 Schematic illustration of eye movements during reading
References in periodicals archive ?
For their book Reading Don't Fix No Chevys, Michael Smith and Jeffrey Wilhelm researched the historic aversion that male students have to reading.
English is usually in 45-minute periods," she says, "but the data say that students need two hours of reading a day to maintain grade level.
The limited studies available so far on L2 reading among young learners indicate that the following cognitive and metacognitve factors are influential with respect to young students' L2 reading: metalinguistic awareness and strategies, phonological/phonemic awareness, and vocabulary (Pang & Kamil, 2004).
Cristian and his friend Mario Villanueva took turns reading to Valantine's black Labrador, Bonnie, petting Bonnie as each other read.
I started getting interested in reading in kindergarten and first grade," says Beard, 23, who was born and reared in Shreveport, Louisiana, and played at Duke University before turning pro.
Here, there is often no thematic relationship between the readings.
Increased understanding of the neural building blocks of successful reading may inspire improved forms of reading instruction.
Then, on August 6, eight months after Reading had filed its suit, Pennsylvania's Common-wealth Court dismissed Reading's complaint, affirming the state education department NCLB sanctions.
Every musical experience children then have should be taught as language--with the four vocabularies: aural, verbal, reading and writing, being taught in that order.
McManus's book is written with enough clarity for advanced undergraduates and enough sophistication for graduate and specialized study, and makes a strong case for the value of The Faerie Queene as a rich resource for understanding the politics of women's reading in the Elizabethan period.
The child's reading level must be determined so he/she is working on the instructional, not frustrational level of instruction.

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