reading


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

reading

 [rēd´ing]
understanding of written or printed symbols representing words.
lip reading (speech reading) understanding of speech through observation of the speaker's lip movements.

read·ing

(rēd'ing),
1. The perception and understanding of the meaning of visual symbols (for example, letters or words) by the scanning of writing or print with the eyes.
2. Any of several alternative ways of interpreting symbols, such as Braille or the close observation of a speaker's facial movements.

reading

/read·ing/ (rēd´ing) understanding of written or printed symbols representing words.
lip reading , speech reading understanding of speech through observation of the speaker's lip movements.

reading

Etymology: AS, raedan
the linear process in which the genetic information contained in a nucleotide sequence is decoded, as in the translation of the messenger RNA into a sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide.

read·ing

(rēd'ing)
1. The perception and understanding of the meaning of visual symbols (e.g., letters or words) by the scanning of writing or print with the eyes.
2. Any of several alternative ways of interpreting symbols, such as Braille or the close observation of a speaker's facial movements.

reading 

The act of viewing and interpreting letters, words, sentences, etc. It consists of a pattern of eye movements. The eyes proceed along a line in a series of step-like saccades, separated by fixation pauses during which information from the text is acquired. The amount of reading matter correctly identified during the fixation pause is called the span of recognition or the perceptual span. Most saccades are made from left to right, but some occur in the opposite direction (called regression) to return to text recently read but not yet fully perceived. At the end of the line the eyes make a return sweep to the next line of text (Fig. R3). See saccadic eye movement; developmental eye movement test.
Fig. R3 Schematic illustration of eye movements during readingenlarge picture
Fig. R3 Schematic illustration of eye movements during reading
References in classic literature ?
The subject of reading aloud was farther discussed.
Even in my profession," said Edmund, with a smile, "how little the art of reading has been studied
lies buried at Reading, in the Benedictine abbey founded by him there, the ruins of which may still be seen; and, in this same abbey, great John of Gaunt was married to the Lady Blanche.
At Reading lock we came up with a steam launch, belonging to some friends of mine, and they towed us up to within about a mile of Streatley.
I think that I came of a reading race, which has always loved literature in a way, and in spite of varying fortunes and many changes.
That very chapter 'at you've just been reading troubled me as much as aught--"He that loveth not, knoweth not God.
I want to have my sins blotted out, and to feel that they are remembered no more against me, and that the love of God is shed abroad in my heart; and if I can get no good by reading my Bible an' saying my prayers at home, what good shall I get by going to church?
After reading one or two of the more coherent passages Henry recoiled from the ever-darkening horror of the story.
The man with the book was not reading aloud, and no one spoke; all seemed to be waiting for something to occur; the dead man only was without expectation.
The prose reading should consist of or include the letter to Lord Chesterfield, a few essays from 'The Rambler,' one or more of the 'Lives of the Poets' and perhaps a part of
Yet I sustained myself by the prospect of such reading in future.
Again, the indolent reader, as well as spectator, finds great advantage from both these; for, as they are not obliged either to see the one or read the others, and both the play and the book are thus protracted, by the former they have a quarter of an hour longer allowed them to sit at dinner, and by the latter they have the advantage of beginning to read at the fourth or fifth page instead of the first, a matter by no means of trivial consequence to persons who read books with no other view than to say they have read them, a more general motive to reading than is commonly imagined; and from which not only law books, and good books, but the pages of Homer and Virgil, of Swift and Cervantes, have been often turned over.

Full browser ?