read


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read

Etymology: AS, raedan, to advise
(of a computer) to retrieve or transfer data from some storage location or medium, such as a disk.

Dick-Read,

Grantley, English physician, 1890-1959.
Read method - psychoprophylactic method of prepared childbirth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Later, venturing into other genres, I read The Education of Little Tree, The Power of One, and Anpao (the first book assigned in school that I liked).
Calkins advocates 90-minute language arts periods where students read at least 30 minutes in class, followed by explicit instruction on reading skills such as looking for clues about what will happen next in a story, or making connections between the setting of a novel and how it affects the characters.
Robert Read was a college student when he decided he needed to be a part of the war looming on the horizon.
They read to the dogs for several weeks to prepare them.
Read how rosemary's antioxidant power can help get rid of cancer-causing compounds in meat.
Today, Read to Achieve is operating in all 30 NBA markets, including the 13 WNBA franchises, 10 of which are in cities with NBA franchises, as well as cities where the National Basketball Development League operates, and even overseas in its Basketball Without Borders program.
SKILLED BRAINS When Ethan piqued the interest of Georgetown's Guinevere Eden, her team had already made headway in identifying how the brain develops in healthy kids who read well.
In cases where a building is still on frontage and stores are metered properly, the commercial meters, while being read and billed by the DEE are called branch meters.
If you think about teaching a child to read a book, you would recognize immediately the importance of that child having had extensive verbal experience--first a breadth of aural experience from hearing language for years, then the development of an oral vocabulary, beginning with the speaking of single words (often charmingly mispronounced), then two or three words put together and then simple sentences.
McManus provides a very useful overview of what we do know about reading practices of aristocratic women in chapter 1, looking at library inventories, prescriptions for women's reading, and reading journals, and concluding that Spenser's women readers shared the political awareness of his general readership and that women read broadly, not always conforming to dicta about what they should read.
Accurate records need to be kept pertaining to which selection is being read by a child as well as which words were missed during the oral reading.