reactogenicity

reactogenicity

(rē-ak-tō-je-nĭ-sĭ'tē),
State of being able to produce adverse reactions.

reactogenic

(rē-ak″tŏ-jen′ik) [ react(ion) + -genic]
Capable of producing a physiologic response, as a vaccine that elicits an antibody response.
reactogenicity (-jĕ-nis′ĭt-ē)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Immunogenicity, safety, and reactogenicity of the 10-valent pneumococcal nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine and DTPa-IPV-Hib when coadministered as a 3-dose primary vaccination schedule in The Netherlands: a randomized controlled trial.
Open Competition: Clinical studies of safety, reactogenicity and immunogenicity of a combined vector Ebola vaccine in healthy volunteers
Safety, reactogenicity, and immunogenicity of human rotavirus vaccine RIX4414 in human immunodeficiency virus-positive infants in South Africa.
Safety and reactogenicity of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus (types 6, 11, 16, 18) LI viral-like-particle vaccine in older adolescents and young adults.
Reactogenicity and immunogenicity of a Lyme disease vaccine in children 2-5 years old.
Safety and reactogenicity of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus (types 6, 11, 16, 18) L1 viral-like-particle vaccine in older adolescents and young adults.
While response rates may be low, it remains important to monitor the AEFI profile of newly introduced adolescent vaccines in terms of safety, timing of booster doses, and reactogenicity of multiple vaccines administered concurrently as these may provide direction for the recommended site of administration.
Immunogenicity and reactogenicity of influenza A/New Jersey/76 virus vaccines in normal adults.
Immunogenicity and reactogenicity of a 13-valent-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine administered at 2, 4, and 12 months of age: a double-blind randomized active-controlled trial.
All these developments led to the resurgence of the concept of dead (inactivated) vaccines that may be administrated orally without any apparent reactogenicity or risk of reversion to virulence.
Thus, a team of UK researchers set out to evaluate the safety, reactogenicity (tendency to cause reactions), and immunogenicity (ability to induce an antibody response) of the two vaccines in children aged 6 months to 12 years, to inform the scientific community, policy makers and parents.