reactivate

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re·ac·ti·vate

(rē-ak'ti-vāt),
1. To render active again.
2. In particular, of an inactivated immune serum to which normal serum (complement) is added.

reactivate

[rē·ak′tivāt]
Etymology: L, re + activus
to make active again, as in adding fresh serum to restore the potency of an original supply of the serum.

re·ac·ti·vate

(rē-ak'ti-vāt)
To render active once again; in particular, of an activated immune serum to which normal serum (complement) is added.

Patient discussion about reactivate

Q. Does anyone have experience treating reactive arthritis? symtoms: bladder incontence, sore joint, eye irritation, cracked fingers and lips

A. The management of reactive arthritis usually starts with pain killers and injection of steroids into the joints, and if necessary, stronger medications. Due to the severity of this condition, consulting a doctor may be wise.

You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000440.htm

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References in periodicals archive ?
This report stresses the importance of awareness of this rare and lethal adverse effect and the evaluation of CMV reactivation while a patient revealed persistent and aggravated symptoms with a reduction of the leukocyte counts.
Reactivation of human herpesvirus (HHV) family members other than HHV-6 in drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome.
Patients with evidence of current or prior HBV infection should be monitored for HBV surface antigen and HBV DNA, as well as serum aminotransferase bilirubin levels, and watched for signs of hepatitis flare or HBV reactivation during and after DAA treatment.
These patients either failed to improve or deteriorated, prompting concerns about HBV reactivation.
The patients who developed HBV reactivation were heterogeneous in terms of HCV genotype.
Caption: Reactivation of hepatitis B virus infection was not studied during the drug development phase.
The herpes zoster reactivation occurred during the second cycle of this treatment.
The dosage was calculated taking into account his kidney disease, and the patient presented no further viral reactivation.
In a phase III trial (the APEX Study), which involved 663 subjects, a significantly higher incidence of VZV reactivation was reported in patients treated with bortezomib than in patients treated with dexamethasone (3).
All 25 patients were HSV seropositive; viral isolation in bronchial aspirate showed reactivation of HSV in 8 (32%) patients, thereby showing for the first time that HSV and CMV reactivation were associated (p = 0.
CMV reactivation developed in one third of our patients within 2 weeks of onset of septic shock, as has been found in studies using a similar prospective study design (3,11).
We hypothesize that upon CMV reactivation, patients with septic shock could mount a protective antiviral immune response, which was different from the immune response of most patients after transplantations (19); however, this hypothesis remains to be confirmed.