rationing


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Related to rationing: Office of War Information

rationing

Managed care The allocation or distribution of a scarce product, commodity or service. See Age-based rationing, Health care rationing, Oregon plan, Red-tape rationing.

ra·tion·ing

(rash'ŭn-ing)
Allotment or distribution of fixed portions.
[L. ratio, calculation]

rationing

Resource allocation in health care, esp. in managed health care systems.

rationing

See MEDICAL RATIONING.
References in periodicals archive ?
But, as one man told the Chronicle in the years after the war: "Even during wartime rationing, we didn't have the anxiety that we'd starve, because we grew our own potatoes, you know?
The largest and clearest example of rationing is American
But there's plenty of anecdotal evidence of care rationing (see "What nurses are saying" .
Feeling that it would help feed Europe, US citizens supported food rationing during WWII.
Children enjoy a piece of fruit cake made out of rationed goods - but today's diets are often poorer than during the war when rationing restricted choice
Another very common form of rationing is by health condition.
Nearby Long Island, which is also dealing with long gas lines, will begin fuel rationing as well on Friday.
During the war rationing was by and large accepted but by 1948 the war had been over for three years.
What is it about rationing of care that evokes such heated, visceral reaction?
After being deprived of meat for so long when rationing ended and if they could afford it many people concentrated on meat dishes for their evening meal, cooking an impressive joint for Sunday lunch.
Citizens in many areas complain that EDL has increased electricity rationing since the winter started as private generator providers supplied their subscribers with more electricity at more expensive rates.