rationale

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Related to rationales: ratiocination

rationale

[rash′ənal′]
Etymology: L, rationalis, reasonable
a system of reasoning or a statement of the reasons used in explaining data or phenomena.

rationale

(răsh″ŭn-ăl′) [L.]
The logical or fundamental reason for a course of action or procedure.

rationale (rash´ənal´),

n the fundamental reasons used as the basis for a decision or action.
References in periodicals archive ?
Seven percent of the teachers' rationales focused on health and safety issues.
This was an unexpected result, in view of the fact that the control rationale specifically targeted these variables whereas the acceptance and placebo rationales did not.
To further analyze the impact of rationales within each reference price condition, we first divided the subjects into two groups: those who were presented with a reference price, and those who were not.
The foregoing summary of results suggested a classification using two dimensions: the importance of an organizational rationale and the importance of a social rationale.
Along these same lines, petitioners should think strategically about which rationale to select and take care to avoid conclusory assertions devoid of underlying facts and evidence to support their rationales.
Given the freedom to make choices, teachers should have thoughtful, sound rationales for their decision-making.
The doctrine of double effect, together with other moral principles that appeal to the intentions of moral agents, has come under attack from many directions in recent years, as have a variety of rationales that have been given in favor of it.
Some authors stated their rationale clearly, while others' rationales were less explicit.
In the current study, we compared the effects of rationales to a differential reinforcement procedure and a guided compliance procedure.
Social rationales for placing students may be based on which students get along well with each other.
Rationales for teaching graphic novels; including lesson ideas for 108 graphic novels.
By the 1990s, however, the neocons had changed, adopting rationales that "were used to justify an American foreign policy that overemphasized the use of force and led logically to the Iraq war.