Angiostrongylus cantonensis

(redirected from rat lungworm)

An·gi·o·stron·gy·lus can·ton·en·'sis

lungworm of rodents, a species transmitted by infected mollusks ingested by rodents; larvae develop in the brain and migrate to lungs, where the adult worms are found; thought to cause eosinophilic encephalomeningitis in humans in the Pacific basin; larvae have been removed from cerebrospinal fluid and the anterior chamber of the eye from people in Thailand who had eaten raw snails.

Angiostrongylus cantonensis

A filiform nematode for which rats are the definitive host; humans become infected by ingesting third-stage larvae in raw or poorly cooked intermediate hosts (e.g., snails, slugs) or transport hosts (e.g., freshwater prawns, frogs, fish and planarians), or by consuming fresh produce contaminated with either of the above hosts. A. cantonensis rarely infects humans, even in regions of endemic infection (e.g., Southeast Asia or the Pacific Basin; it is, nonetheless, the most common cause of eosinophilic meningitis in humans.

Angiostrongylus

a genus of worms of the family Angiostrongylidae.

Angiostrongylus cantonensis
the rat lungworm which may cause eosinophilic meningitis in humans and other species including dogs.
Angiostrongylus costaricensis
parasitizes the blood vessels of the alimentary tract of wild rodents and may infect humans causing eosinophilic granulomas in the intestine.
Angiostrongylus mackerrasae
a rat lungworm which may also cause eosinophilic meningitis in humans.
Angiostrongylus vasorum
the 'lungworm' of dogs; occurs in the pulmonary artery and right ventricle of dogs and foxes. Pulmonary emphysema and fibrosis may be accompanied by congestive heart failure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Along with snails and slugs, rat lungworm can parasitize frogs, land crabs and freshwater shrimp, which might also pass the infection to human beings if these animals are consumed raw or not properly cooked, according to the CDC.
The Hawaii Department of Health (DOH) has confirmed the first case of rat lungworm disease in the state this year in an adult resident of West Hawaii on Hawaii Island.
procyonis roundworms and samples taken on day 56 to test for Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the rat lungworm.
A parasitic nematode, the rat lungworm starts off by infecting a rat's lungs, blood and brain.
Biology, systematics, life cycle, and distribution of Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the cause of rat lungworm disease.
The rat lungworm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, traditionally found in the Asia-Pacific region, has been identified recently for the first time in rats in KZN at a substantial prevalence of 14%.
The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) recently launched a statewide broadcast media campaign to educate residents and visitors about rat lungworm disease, a potentially devastating illness that can have debilitating effects on an infected persons brain and spinal cord.
Rat lungworm disease was found in at least five counties in the Sunshine State by a group of scientists at the University of Florida.
The occurrence of the rat lungworm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, in nonindigenous snails in the Gulf of Mexico region of the United States.
The Hawaii Department of Health (DOH) has been working collaboratively with the Governors Joint Task Force on Rat Lungworm Disease to better provide widespread education about the risks associated with this debilitating disease and how to prevent it, as well as address issues around diagnosis and treatment.
Angiostrongiylus cantonensis is a rat lungworm that has long been recognized as a cause of eosinophilic meningitis in Southeast Asia, the Pacific Islands, and the Caribbean, where it is endemic (1).

Full browser ?