rarefy

(redirected from rarified)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

rar·e·fy

(rār'ĕ-fī),
To become light or less dense.

rarefy

(rār′ĕ-fī)
To make less dense; to increase the porosity of something.
References in periodicals archive ?
Americans may be fretting about rising energy prices, the worsening home mortgage crisis, and falling home values but, in the rarified air at 40,000 feet where the super-rich cruise aboard their private jets, it is a different story.
30pm) Lava Man (Doug O'Neill/Corey Nakatani), the seven-time Grade 1 winner and notable omission from last weekend's Breeders' Cup, bids to return to winning ways in less rarified surroundings after a pair of below-par efforts.
The letters contain a wealth of technical information and breathe the rarified air of the book collector's world: long-vanished authors, illustrators, bookbinders, book dealers and auction houses.
Tobold breathes the rarified air of a person whose wealth mocks the very notion of wealth.
The air up there, rarified though it may be, is important to this business.
Wigan boss Chris Hutchings' team are sniffing the rarified air near the top of the table despite being dismissed by many as no-hopers.
dreams, rarified as prayers, fragrances with an openness that's so
Finding no one home, he scaled the stone wall and made his way into the great one's study, where he did nothing but breathe in the rarified atmosphere and rearranged five coins on Jung's mantelpiece into a more balanced formation.
In 2005 it also achieved a remarkable 100% on-time delivery record, putting it in very rarified company among the total supplier base.
With help from his wife, Lucy, Buchanan has traveled in rarified social circles around the world, enabling the museum to put together high profile shows sych as 2000's "Stroganoff," which brought together works from the Russian aristocratic family, and 2002's "Stuff of Dreams," with works borrowed from the Musee des Arts Decoratifs in Paris.
In the face of the remarkable glut of biennials that attends the current evolution of globalization in art, a number of questions still remain unanswered: To what degree does the biennial act as a force of transnational gentrification, creating a market of elite consumer goods and rarified experience in far-flung places (often playing on earlier avant-garde tropes of exoticism) in order to tender the ground for the subsequent onslaught of corporate imperialism?
Actually, there is more to choose from in the rarified over-$100,000 market than you might think.