range-of-motion exercise


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

range-of-motion exercise

Etymology: OFr, ranger, to arrange in a row; L, motio, movement
any body action involving the muscles, joints, and natural movements, such as abduction, adduction, extension, flexion, pronation, supination, and rotation. Such exercises are usually applied actively or passively in the prevention and treatment of orthopedic deformities, in the assessment of injuries and deformities, and in athletic conditioning. See also active range of motion, passive range of motion.
Enlarge picture
RANGE-OF-MOTION EXERCISES

range-of-motion exercise

Movement of a joint through its available range of motion. It can be used to prevent loss of motion.
See: illustration
See also: exercise
References in periodicals archive ?
Early, vigorous physical therapy with range-of-motion exercises is necessary to stop the condition's progress, but pain must be relieved before therapy begins.
This could be as simple as tapping into a child's love of music and incorporating dancing, marching, or doing a few range-of-motion exercises to the beat of the music.
Range-of-motion exercises help reduce stiffness and improve the flexibility in your joints.
As part of the awareness drive, a team of physiotherapists demonstrated Passive Range-of-Motion exercises to the nursing staff for patients who are unable to move against gravity and need help to fully stretch their muscles and move their joints to prevent problems associated with immobility.
Kevin soon began gentle range-of-motion exercises and strengthening exercises to give added stability to my wrist joint," said Sherman.
Physical therapy sessions consisted strength, balance, and range-of-motion exercises as well as deep-tissue massage and home exercise recommendations.