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random

 [ran´dum]
pertaining to a chance-dependent process.

ran·dom

(ran'dŏm),
1. Governed by chance; used of a process in which the outcome is indeterminate but may assume any of a set of values (the domain) with probabilities specifiable in advance. Although the random process is widely used in probability theory, empiric justification for the term is more complicated. The minimum requirement is that repeated realization of the process will settle down to a stable distribution or, if not metric, a stable set of frequencies if the trait is classifiable only.
2.
[M.E. randon, speed, errancy, fr. O. Fr. randir, to run, fr. Germanic]

random

/ran·dom/ (ran´dom) pertaining to a chance-dependent process, particularly one that occurs according to a known probability distribution.

random

Occurring by chance alone–ie, not by design, pattern, plan, or selection Clinical trials Referring to a formal chance process in which previous events have no bearing on future events. See Random allocation, Randomized trial.

ran·dom

(ran'dŏm)
Governed by chance; denotes a process in which outcome is indeterminate.
[M.E. randon, speed, errancy, fr. O. Fr. randir, to run, fr. Germanic]

random

unplanned, without direction or purpose.

random assignment
random mating
where each member of the population has an equal opportunity of mating with every member of the opposite sex.
random numbers
a list of numbers obtained by a standard randomization procedure; used commonly to select individual animals from a pack.
random sample
see random sample.
random sampling
a procedure for selecting units from a group in such a way that each unit has an equal chance of being selected in the sample.
random selection
selection in such a way as to produce a random sample.
random variable
a group or quantity that takes various values, each with varying probabilities.
References in periodicals archive ?
It would help if the class developed a glossary and map of the terminology that they were using, particularly notions about randomness, samples and populations.
I begin with nine exemplars of randomness that show how the term is used in mathematics, statistics, and the sciences; they will illustrate key ideas later in this article.
However, the math gets quite involved, so we'll simply use the key idea: inserting randomness into your strategy will mask your decision.
But before considering this second type of argument, it is necessary to clarify the concept of randomness that is crucial to Schonborn's argument.
One comes away, despite the randomness, feeling that one has had contact with a thoughtful, original mind.
If the data set is small, the law becomes less accurate because there are not enough items in the sample and so the rules of randomness don't apply--or at least apply with less predictability.
The randomness of terrorist attacks in New York and Bali has led to a sense that there is nothing most organisations can do to protect their workforces, claims a Foreign Policy Centre document, published today.
If purposelessness and randomness really do define the world and ourselves, Weigel writes, then one possible answer to the question "What will become of us?
This book tackles a vast array of problems in science, ranging from the origins of apparent randomness in physical systems, to the interplay between free will and determinism.
Fooled by Randomness tells the reader how randomness and chance infects and alters everything in life, while centering mainly on the effect it has on the markets.
Unlike earthquakes or hurricanes, terrorism is hard to quantify, since it has an element of randomness to it, explains Shah.