randomization

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randomization

 [ran″dom-ĭ-za´shun]
random assignment.
The use of randomization in the design of a clinical trial. From Gordis, 1996.

ran·dom·i·za·tion

(ran'dom-ĭ-zā'shun),
Random allocation, the process of selecting entities, for example, treatment regimens, using a formal system whereby each entity has a known, generally an equal chance of being selected. This may be accomplished by means of a table of random numbers, toss of a coin, or some other system in which selection or nonselection is determined by chance alone.

randomization

Etymology: ME, randoun, run violently
the process of assigning subjects or objects to a control or experimental group on a random basis.

randomization

Random assignment, random allocation, randomized allocation Statistics The selection of subjects or samples for each 'arm' of a study or experiment based on chance alone–ie, a theoretical coin toss, which is intended to minimize the influence of irrelevant details and selection bias, and produce statistically valid data. Cf Convenience sample.

ran·dom·i·za·tion

(ran'dŏm-ī-zā'shŭn)
Assignment of the subjects of experimental research to groups by chance.
Synonym(s): randomisation.

randomization (ranˈ·d·m·zāˑ·shn),

n a method based on chance in which participants of a clinical study are assigned to comparison and/or control and treatment groups. Randomization minimizes the differences among groups by equally distributing people with particular characteristics among all the trial groups. Randomization can also be done in laboratory and observational studies.

randomization

the performance of a function, e.g. selection, in a random manner.
References in periodicals archive ?
I would never presume to challenge standardized, evidence-based practice at its own game, but I can say with some certainty that it is absurd to use randomized controlled trials to define everything important in critical care.
It would seem ironic if increasing randomized field trial usage caused the effectiveness of many potentially valuable programs to be systematically underestimated.
In a review of psychotherapy research, published in the July 2004 Psychological Bulletin, Westen described national surveys of clinicians indicating that psychological treatments in the community last considerably longer than do those studied in randomized controlled trials.
Among studies reporting intention to-treat analyses, fewer than half actually analyzed all randomized subjects.
Not just education but the social sciences in general lag behind the hard sciences in the use of randomized trials.
Emerging data from several randomized trials suggest that chemotherapy administered during radiation might improve local control rates (and in some instances even survival rates) to a greater degree than does radiation alone (15-17) The results of a large, well-done meta-analysis by Pignon et al, who looked at the effects of chemotherapy added to locoregional treatment, suggested that a significant survival benefit (8%) was associated with concomitant chemoradiation schedules.
Use of a commercially available chlorhexidine-impregnated sponge dressing at the insertion site of central venous and arterial catheters led to a threefold reduction in catheterrelated bloodstream infections in a recent prospective, randomized study (22).
For example, in the early recruitment period for the clinical trials, it was estimated that less than 1 percent of patients with metastatic breast cancer who received an ABMT did so within the context of a randomized clinical trial.
Byar and others want a randomized intervention trial, because no other type of study can definitively determine whether fat promotes breast cancer.
NASDAQ:VITA), a spine and orthopedic biosurgery company, reported that it has completed patient enrollment for its pivotal, prospective, randomized study for CORTOSS([R]) Bone Augmentation Material in development for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures.
It is very common in experimental studies in education as illustrated, for instance, in a meta-analysis studying "the effects of attrition on baseline comparability in randomized experiments in education" (Valentine & McHugh, 2007) that found that 119 of 367 randomized education experiments reported student-level attrition.
Moreover, this randomized study has again confirmed the safety and tolerability profile of TracleerTM in the scleroderma patient population.

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