ramose


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ramose

 [ra´mōs]
branching; having many branches.

branch·ing

(branch'ing),
Dividing into parts; sending out offshoots; bifurcating.
Synonym(s): ramose, ramous
[Fr. branche, related to L. branchium, arm]

ramose

/ra·mose/ (ra´mos) branching; having many branches.

ramose

(rā′mōs′, rə-mōs′)
adj.
Having many branches: a ramose bryozoan.

ramose

Many-branched.

ramose

branching; having many branches.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Ramose added: "If he allows it to affect his judgment, then obviously that would be a matter of concern.
Some of the notable applications include Ramose (1999), Teffo (1995) and Shutte (2001) who have focused on the importance of Ubuntu in African philosophy in areas such as morality/ethics, epistemology, logic and metaphysics.
Ramose, 2002; Wiredu, 2004; Waghid, 2011; Metz, 2014; and others), or Ubuntu in relation to the inclusion of marginalized groups, particularly women, or those who have discussed women's access to and inclusion in higher education (like Kwesiga, 2002; Mama, 2006; Assie-Lumumba, 2007; etc.
The name of Moses himself is a common element in Egyptian names, connoting "son" or "incarnation" and preceded by the name of a deity it honors; among the examples are the pharaohs Kamose, Ahmose, Thutmose, Ramose [Ramses].
Consisting of Nakht (TT 52), Ramose (TT 55), Userhat (TT 56), Menna (TT 69), Sennefer (TT 96), and Rekhmire (TT 100), these tombs date from Tuthmosis III (TT 56 and 100) to Amenhotep IV (TT 55).
Other material included the once-ubiquitous pyrrhotite, now rarely seen but still being produced in eye-catching variety if small quantity, and some miniatures of small but clean pyrite dode cahedra on strange ramose growths of greenish aragonite.
This relief is a detail of a scene depicting the deceased, Ramose, and his wife receiving offerings.
Both Bewaji and Ramose agreed that a fundamental dynamic of the socio-political and economic crises that begot (in the post-independence era) and continues to beget African people (and a greater part of the neo-colonial world) is the 'struggle for meaning'.
Ramose {1999:144} attests that the concept of a king with absolute power is odd to traditional African constitutional thought because the king's orders to the nation derived their validity from the fact that they had previously been discussed and agreed to between the king and his councillors.
This seems to be a popular view defended by most African writers that include Moqobe Ramose, Stanlake Samkange and Tommie Marie Samkange, Thaddeus Metz, Desmond Tutu, Charles Vila-Vicencio and others.
Since 1973, a number of attempts have been made to explore the philosophy of hunhu (Gelfand, 1973; Samkange and Samkange, 1980; Mhundwa, 1982; Makuvaza, 1996a, 1996b; Shutte, 1993; Prinsloo, 1998; Ramose, 1999; Nziramasanga, 1999; Panse, 2006; Swanson; 2007, Van Eck, 2010; Hapanyengwi, 2011), also known through its variants: unhu, ubuntu, botho, thus, we are going to engage a few of these attempts.
Mogobe Ramose locates this arrogance and the prejudices of Western thought in what he termed "the struggle for reason in Africa.