ramify


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Related to ramify: temporize, Vivary

ramify

 [ram´ĭ-fi]
1. to branch; to diverge in different directions.
2. to traverse in branches.

ram·i·fy

(ram'i-fī),
To split into a branchlike pattern.
[L. ramus, branch, + facio, to make]

ramify

/ram·i·fy/ (ram´ĭ-fi)
1. to branch; to diverge in different directions.
2. to traverse in branches.

ramify

See ramus.

ram·i·fy

(ram'i-fī)
To split into a branchlike pattern.
[L. ramus, branch, + facio, to make]

ram·i·fy

(ram'i-fī)
To split into a branchlike pattern.
[L. ramus, branch, + facio, to make]

ramify (ram´əfī),

v to branch; to diverge in various directions; to traverse in branches.

ramify

1. to branch; to diverge in different directions.
2. to traverse in branches.
References in periodicals archive ?
They mount with the vibration of the buses from boxes that were often unbolted from the mouths of passengers until they would ramify and intertwine, stir woes and reopen wounds.
argue, on that basis, for a revision of the later phases of the islands' prehistory, including the development of post-Lapita pottery, with implications that ramify out to Tonga and Samoa.
I have also studied a remarkable poster-sized chart of character geneologies and connections long enough to see just how much Morrow is compelled by the idea of character networks unfolding in time--networks that ramify to bring together individuals from very different backgrounds.
An even more useful series of entries sketches the hybridization of sf with fantasy, horror, allegorical romance, and surrealism: A general entry on Hybrid Texts exfoliates out into Ambiguous Texts and Chimerical Texts, which further ramify into literary forms such as Visionary Fantasy, Horror-SF, Slipstream, and so on.
Stories have a tendency to ramify when unchecked, after all, and Montalbetti gives them free rein here, encouraging her reader to follow the alluring meanders of narrative.
The films ramify with other critical projects, too, such as those of Paul Virilio, Manuel De Landa, and Samuel Weber; Martin Heidegger and Walter Benjamin are more explicit points of reference for Farocki.