raised

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raised

(rāzd) [ME. reisen, to rise]
Elevated above a surface.
References in periodicals archive ?
The player must raise the weight at a speed that forces the muscles to perform all of the work.
To say the Valley can't raise that kind of money is not true,'' Smith said.
Raising phase: Have the athlete take eight seconds to raise the weight through the full range of motion, then pause momentarily before going on to the next rep.
Since the federal government has made a huge slash in funding for ALS research, Brandau said it is imperative that people continue to find alternate ways to raise money for the cause.
The raises for just the top-paid city workers - and elected officials and their bloated staffs - and the fee raises for residents just illustrate the continuing contempt that City Hall has for the most vulnerable, the least powerful members of its city family.
The firm helps General Partners (GPs) build and develop their private equity firms and raise funds from institutional investors.
If your boss is unwilling to heed your demands, ask him or her what you need to achieve in order to qualify for a raise or promotion.
1 -- color) Palmdale High School students do Laps 4 Lungs around the muddy football field track to raise money to fight lung cancer.
Teachers late last year agreed to a 2 percent retroactive pay hike for last year and a 1 percent bonus in lieu of a raise this year.
Instead of the organization spending thousands of dollars creating expensive direct mail pieces, they now focus on educating participants on how to raise money online, which in turn, will help raise more money for their mission.
The Utah Sting fast-pitch softball team have sold the wristbands to their fans in order to raise the needed funds for travel costs and registration fees.
While average pay raises in 2005 are only slightly higher than last year, workers who last year received either no raise or one below the average might be pleasantly surprised to receive an above average raise this year to compensate," according to Bill Coleman, senior vice president of compensation at Salary.