radula


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radula

(răj′o͝o-lə)
n. pl. radu·lae (-lē′)
A flexible tonguelike organ found in most mollusks, having rows of horny teeth on the surface and used in feeding for scraping or cutting.

rad′u·lar adj.

radula

a rasping organ of molluscs situated in a sac on the underside of the BUCCAL cavity. It is used for tearing plant material by rubbing it against the hardened surface of the mouth.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the lower areas of the eastern slopes, the ground stratum has greater cover of Gahnia radula and Forest Wire Grass Tetrarrhena juncea with a medium to tall shrub layer.
4 mm ML), ventral view, f) dorsal view, g) sucker from right arm III, h) upper beak, i) lower beak, j) radula, k) funnel valve.
The radula is probably not useful for distinguishing between species of Craspedochiton (H.
Species abundance and size frequencies were compared to abiotic and biotic reef characteristics and radula morphology was examined during development from post larva to mature adult.
Rudkin, "A Soft-Bodied Mollusc with Radula from the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale," Nature 442 (2006): 159-63.
Over time, chitons have evolved to eat algae growing on and within rocks using a specialized rasping organ called a radula, a conveyer belt-like structure in the mouth that contains 70 to 80 parallel rows of teeth.
The first section illustrates the differences between nautilids and ammonoids in respect to shell shape, ornamentation, body chamber, phragmocone, septa, the siphuncle and buoyancy regulation, apparatus, radula and diet, arms and tentacles, eyes, development, mode of life, reproduction, dimorphism, stability, swimming, pathology and teratology, taphonomy, biostratigraphy, mass extinctions, and more.
Grimmia curviseta Boumann, Radula jonesii Bouman, Dirkse & Radula wichure Steph.
The central tooth of the radula is relatively broad and is almost as wide as the lateral teeth.
London, August 23 ( ANI ): A "prototype" radula found in 500-million-year-old fossils studied by researchers shows that the earliest radula was not a flesh-rasping terror, but a tool for humbly scooping food from the muddy sea floor.
2006, A soft-bodied mollusc with radula from the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale: Nature, v.