radium-226

radium-226

a radioactive isotope used for most of the twentieth century to fill the needles and tubes required for brachytherapy. It is now being replaced by cesium-137 and cobalt-60, which have similar energy characteristics but are not subject to hazardous leakage as radium sources sometimes are.
References in periodicals archive ?
The primary contaminants found were radium-226, uranium-238 and uranium-235.
Lead-210 and radium-226 take around 100 years to reach this equilibrium.
We are troubled by people drinking water that [could potentially have] radium-226 in it," says David Brown, a public health toxicologist with the Southwest Pennsylvania Environmental Health Project.
Flowback water also picks up natural contaminants from underground such as radioactive Radium-226 and the ReFINE project will look at the potential concentrations of these compared to other fossil fuels and the nuclear industry.
The plant does not test for gamma-emitting radionuclides and radium-226 on a daily basis, he reported.
The truck was carrying highly radioactive radium-226 in concentrations 86 times higher than allowed per EPA limits.
Up until 1959, the MoD dumped radium-226 contained in the luminous paints used in old aircraft instruments in the area when they were repairing and salvaging old planes.
All its isotopes are highly radioactive, and its most stable one, radium-226, decays into radium gas.
While indications are that flow-back fluid from hydraulically fracturing the Marcellus Shale in the northeast, including Pennsylvania, can contain elevated levels of radium-226, Oil and Gas Division Commission staff inform me that they have no indication that radium-226 levels are above regulatory levels in the Barnett Shale or the Eagle Ford Shale in Texas, which are geologically different shales than Pennsylvania Marcellus shale.
New York's Department of Environmental Conservation analyzed 13 samples of wastewater brought to the surface from drilling and found that they contained levels of radium-226 as high as 267 times the limit for safe discharge into the environment, and thousands of times more than the federal limit for human consumption.
During the 1980s and early 1990s, elevated concentrations of radium-226 and radon-222 in groundwater wells and tap water were reported in Harris County, Texas, particularly in the northwest.