synostosis

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synostosis

 [sin″os-to´sis]
normal or abnormal union of two bones by osseous material. adj., adj synostot´ic.

syn·os·to·sis

(sin'os-tō'sis), [TA]
Osseous union between two bones that are not supposed to be united; commonly refers to formation of a bony bundle between the radius and ulna following fracture of these two bones.
[syn- + G. osteon, bone, + -osis, condition]

synostosis

/syn·os·to·sis/ (-os-to´sis) pl. synosto´ses  
1. a union between adjacent bones or parts of a single bone formed by osseous material.
2. the osseous union of bones that are normally distinct.synostot´ic

synostosis

(sĭn′ŏs-tō′sĭs)
n. pl. synosto·ses (-sēz)
The fusion of normally separate skeletal bones.

syn′os·tot′ic (-tŏt′ĭk) adj.

synostosis

[sin′ostō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, syn, together, osteon, bone
the joining of two bones by the ossification of connecting tissues. It occurs normally in the fusion of cranial bones to form the skull.

syn·os·to·sis

, synosteosis (sin'os-tō'sis, -tē-ōsis) [TA]
Osseous union between the bones forming a joint.
Synonym(s): bony ankylosis, true ankylosis.

synostosis

bony union between two bones, with resultant loss of joint movement (see tarsal coalitions)

syn·os·to·sis

, synosteosis (sin-os'tō'sis, -tē-ōsis) [TA]
Osseous union between bones forming a joint.
Synonym(s): bony ankylosis, true ankylosis.

synostosis (sin´ōstō´sis),

n the joining of two bones by the ossification of connecting tissues. It occurs normally in the fusion of cranial bones to form the adult skull.

synostosis

pl. synostoses [Gr.] normal or abnormal union of two bones by osseous material.
Enlarge picture
Congenital metatarsal bone synostosis in a dog. By permission from Ettinger SJ, Feldman E, Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Saunders, 2004

radioulnar synostosis
occurs between the radius and ulna as a result of unsatisfactory reduction of fractures.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ring, "Operative treatment of post-traumatic proximal radioulnar synostosis," The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery--American Volume, vol.
Jones, "Treatment of traumatic radioulnar synostosis by excision and postoperative low-dose irradiation," Journal of Hand Surgery, vol.
Ross, "Preventing recurrence of radioulnar synostosis with pedicled adipofascial flaps," The Journal of Hand Surgery: European Volume, vol.
48,77-79) The incidence of heterotopic ossification and radioulnar synostosis appears to be higher with the two-incision approach, although cases of motion limiting heterotopic ossification have been reported after the one-incision approach.
Four cases of non-motion limiting heterotopic ossification were noted, but no cases of radioulnar synostosis were seen.
Failla and colleagues (80) reported on four cases of complete radioulnar synostosis with the original two-incision approach and their results after surgical resection.
Because of the decreased wing extension and associated function attributed to the radioulnar synostosis, surgical separation of the radius and ulna with interposition of a polypropylene mesh was elected.
In this report, we document the successful surgical treatment of a posttraumatic radioulnar synostosis in a Mississippi kite by excision of the bony union and interposition of a polypropylene mesh between the radius and ulna.
Radioulnar synostosis can occur both as a postoperative complication or when external coaptation is used as the sole form of stabilization.
However, it was decided not to proceed with this alternative approach in order to minimize the risk of new bone formation in the proximal metaphysis of the ulna after healing of the osteotomy thereby avoiding the risk of proximal radioulnar synostosis in an area of cancellous bone exposed by resection of the osteochondroma.
Radioulnar synostosis and loss of pronation are the major complications of late treatment of chronic radial head dislocation.
Jupiter JB, Ring D: Operative treatment of post-traumatic proximal radioulnar synostosis.