synostosis

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synostosis

 [sin″os-to´sis]
normal or abnormal union of two bones by osseous material. adj., adj synostot´ic.

syn·os·to·sis

(sin'os-tō'sis), [TA]
Osseous union between two bones that are not supposed to be united; commonly refers to formation of a bony bundle between the radius and ulna following fracture of these two bones.
[syn- + G. osteon, bone, + -osis, condition]

synostosis

/syn·os·to·sis/ (-os-to´sis) pl. synosto´ses  
1. a union between adjacent bones or parts of a single bone formed by osseous material.
2. the osseous union of bones that are normally distinct.synostot´ic

synostosis

(sĭn′ŏs-tō′sĭs)
n. pl. synosto·ses (-sēz)
The fusion of normally separate skeletal bones.

syn′os·tot′ic (-tŏt′ĭk) adj.

synostosis

[sin′ostō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, syn, together, osteon, bone
the joining of two bones by the ossification of connecting tissues. It occurs normally in the fusion of cranial bones to form the skull.

syn·os·to·sis

, synosteosis (sin'os-tō'sis, -tē-ōsis) [TA]
Osseous union between the bones forming a joint.
Synonym(s): bony ankylosis, true ankylosis.

synostosis

bony union between two bones, with resultant loss of joint movement (see tarsal coalitions)

syn·os·to·sis

, synosteosis (sin-os'tō'sis, -tē-ōsis) [TA]
Osseous union between bones forming a joint.
Synonym(s): bony ankylosis, true ankylosis.

synostosis (sin´ōstō´sis),

n the joining of two bones by the ossification of connecting tissues. It occurs normally in the fusion of cranial bones to form the adult skull.

synostosis

pl. synostoses [Gr.] normal or abnormal union of two bones by osseous material.
Enlarge picture
Congenital metatarsal bone synostosis in a dog. By permission from Ettinger SJ, Feldman E, Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Saunders, 2004

radioulnar synostosis
occurs between the radius and ulna as a result of unsatisfactory reduction of fractures.
References in periodicals archive ?
The rate of heterotopic ossification and radioulnar synostosis is higher after the two-incision approach, especially if the ulnar periosteum is violated, and the role of indomethacin or radiation therapy to prevent this has not yet been defined.
Proximal radioulnar synostosis after repair of distal biceps brachii rupture by the two-incision technique.
Although surgical treatment of radioulnar synostosis has been performed in birds, the procedure is still considered anecdotal and, to our knowledge, has not been reported in the peer-reviewed literature.
In humans, highly comminuted and open fractures appear more likely to develop posttraumatic radioulnar synostosis.
22) More frequent physical therapy during the initial management of this kite could have prevented the development of a radioulnar synostosis, but the concern was that frequent motion of the bone fragments might delay bone healing.
Alternatively, the use of synthetic materials such as a polypropylene mesh, silicone, or bone wax could prove to be both practical and effective in the management of posttraumatic radioulnar synostosis in birds of prey.
Management of posttraumatic metadiaphyseal radioulnar synostosis.
A comparison of proximal radioulnar synostosis excision after trauma and distal biceps reattachment.
The use of tensor fascia lata interposition grafts for the treatment of posttraumatic radioulnar synostosis.
Management of radioulnar synostosis with mobilization, anconeus interposition, and a forearm rotation assist splint.
The operative management of post-traumatic proximal radioulnar synostosis without adjuvant radiotherapy or indomethacin.