radiosensitivity


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Related to radiosensitivity: law of Bergonie and Tribondeau

radiosensitivity

 [ra″de-o-sen″sĭ-tiv´ĭ-te]
sensitivity of the skin, tumor tissue, or other tissue to radiant energy, such as x-ray or other radiations. adj., adj radiosen´sitive.

ra·di·o·sen·si·tiv·i·ty

(rā'dē-ō-sen'si-tiv'i-tē),
The condition of being readily affected by radiant energy.

radiosensitivity

/ra·dio·sen·si·tiv·i·ty/ (ra″de-o-sen″sĭ-tiv´ĭ-te) sensitivity, as of the skin, tumor tissue, etc., to radiant energy, such as x-rays or other radiation.radiosen´sitive

radiosensitivity

[-sen′sitiv′itē]
the relative susceptibility of cells, tissues, organs, organisms, or any other substances to the effects of radiation. Cells of self-renewing tissues, such as those in the crypts of the intestine, are the most radiosensitive. Cells that divide regularly but mature between divisions, such as spermatogonia and spermatocytes, are somewhat less radiosensitive. Long-lived cells that usually do not divide unless there is a suitable stimulus, such as liver, kidney, and thyroid cells, are even less radiosensitive. Least radiosensitive are cells that have lost the ability to divide, such as neurons. Compare radioresistance. radiosensitive, adj.

radiosensitivity

The relative susceptibility of cells and tissues to irreversible damage by RT, which prevents mitosis or completion of normal metabolism; lymphoid, hematopoietic, and gonadal tissues are most susceptible to radiation damage; some CAs–eg, lymphoproliferative, gonadal malignancies–eg, seminoma and small cell carcinoma of lung 'melt away' with RT. Cf Radioresistance.

ra·di·o·sen·si·tiv·i·ty

(rā'dē-ō-sen'si-tiv'i-tē)
The condition of being readily affected by radiant energy.

ra·di·o·sen·si·tiv·i·ty

(rā'dē-ō-sen'si-tiv'i-tē)
The condition of being readily affected by radiant energy.

radiosensitivity (rā´dēōsen´sitiv´itē),

n relative susceptibility of cells, tissues, organs, organisms, and other substances to the injurious action of radiation.

radiosensitivity

sensitivity, as of the skin, tumor tissue, etc., to radiant energy, such as x-ray or other radiations.
References in periodicals archive ?
This means as reported by Bilquez [10] that the genetic constitution affects radiosensitivity.
The study authors found that the cell growth and radiosensitivity of the malignant tumor cells were not affected by any of the supplements, but two of the supplements inhibited the growth rate of the normal prostate cell lines while a third supplement also increased the cellular radiosensitivity of some normal cell lines by inhibiting DNA repair.
Enhanced radiosensitivity and radiation induced apoptosis in glioma CD133-positive cells by knockdown of SirTI expression.
210]Po because of its radiosensitivity and tendency to concentrate [.
Increased chromosomal radiosensitivity in women carrying BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations assessed with the G2 assay.
Emphasis is on diseases and imaging that are unique to children, as well as to other important aspects of the topic, including patient and family centered care, relationship between imager and the child/parent unit, professionalism and effective communication, child friendly surroundings and techniques, variable size and physiology, radiosensitivity, age related normal anatomy, and age related differential diagnoses.
10,11) The prognosis for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma depends not only on the extent of the primary lesion and the status of the involved nodal tissue, but on the intrinsic radiosensitivity of the tumor tissue, as well.
Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) [1] is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a wide range of clinical manifestations, including cerebellar ataxia, conjunctival telangiectases, recurrent sinopulmonary infections, radiosensitivity, and increased cancer susceptibility (1).
Other clinical uses being investigated for PFC solutions in general include replacing red blood cells during acute blood loss, increasing oxygenation of localized areas of hypoxia, increasing oxygenation of solid tumors to improve radiosensitivity, removing gas microemboli during cardiopulmonary bypass, preserving organs used for transplantation, and allowing liquid breathing for treatment of respiratory distress in premature infants.
and may be used in surface, interstitial, and intracavitary applications for tumors with known radiosensitivity.
Radiation activates HIF-1 to regulate vascular radiosensitivity in tumors: role of reoxygenation, free radicals, and stress granules.