radionuclide


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to radionuclide: Radionuclide imaging, radionuclide scan, Radionuclide bone scan

radionuclide

 [ra″de-o-noo´klīd]
a radioactive nuclide; one that disintegrates with the emission of corpuscular or electromagnetic radiations.

ra·di·o·nu·clide

(rā'dē-ō-nū'klīd),
An isotope of artificial or natural origin that exhibits radioactivity.

radionuclide

/ra·dio·nu·clide/ (-noo´klīd) a nuclide that disintegrates with the emission of corpuscular or electromagnetic radiations.

radionuclide

[-no̅o̅′klīd]
Etymology: L, radiare + nucleus, nut kernel
an isotope that undergoes radioactive decay. Any element with an excess of either neutrons or protons in the nucleus is unstable and tends toward radioactive decay, with the emission of energy that may be measurable with a detector. The processes of radioactive decay include beta particle emission, electron capture, isomeric transition, and positron emission. Positron-emitting radionuclides are important in positron emission tomography and in medical research. Radionuclides used in scintigraphy include 123I, 131I, 111In, 75Se, 99mTc, and 201Tl. Radionuclides of cobalt, iodine, phosphorus, strontium, and other elements are used for treatment of tumors and cancers and for nuclear imaging of internal parts of the body. See also nuclear scanning.

radionuclide

Radioactive isotope, radioisotope Radiation physics A nuclide with an unstable neutron to proton ratio, which undergoes radioactive decay; an artificial or natural nuclide with an unstable nucleus, that decays spontaneously, emitting electrons–β-particles or protons–α-particles and γ-radiation, ultimately achieving nuclear stability; RNs are used as in vivo or in vitro labels, for RT, or as sources of energy

ra·di·o·nu·clide

(rā'dē-ō-nū'klīd)
An isotope of artificial or natural origin that exhibits radioactivity. Radionuclides are used in diagnostic imaging and cancer therapy.

Radionuclide

A chemical substance, called an isotope, that exhibits radioactivity. A gamma camera, used in nuclear medicine procedures, will pick up the radioactive signals as the substance gathers in an organ or tissue. They are sometimes referred to as tracers.

ra·di·o·nu·clide

(rā'dē-ō-nū'klīd)
An isotope of artificial or natural origin that exhibits radioactivity. Radionuclides are used in diagnostic imaging and cancer therapy.

radionuclide (rā´dēōnoo´klīd),

n an unstable or radioactive type of atom characterized by the constitution of its nucleus and capable of existing for a measurable time. The nuclear constitution is specified by the number of protons
(A), number of neutrons
(N), and energy content, or alternatively by the atomic number
(Z), mass number
(A − N + Z), and atomic mass.

radionuclide

a radioactive nuclide; one that disintegrates with the emission of corpuscular or electromagnetic radiations. Used in diagnosis for whole body or individual organ scanning. See also radioactive isotope, nuclide.
References in periodicals archive ?
Once calibrated, the model was used to predict radionuclide transport within groundwater and heat transfer in host formation and potential effect to environment.
While all food contains radionuclides, whether from natural sources, nuclear testing or otherwise, the increased levels found in Japanese spinach and milk pose health risks to the population.
The influence of radionuclide radiation in AC pavement on EDR is analyzed The identified values can be used for comparison while investigating various happenings in the region related to the pollution with radioactive materials.
The objective of this study, which is a continuation of an ongoing monitoring of radionuclide uptake by the native oyster, was to examine the bioaccumulation of radionuclides by C.
Currently, hundreds of new pathway-targeted anticancer agents are undergoing clinical trials, including targeted radionuclide therapies.
Yet the physical properties of many building materials--and of the radioactive isotopes, or radionuclides, that would land on them--complicate the task of thoroughly removing the contamination.
Stress exercise radionuclide imaging appears to be a valuable modality in risk stratification in SAS for possible therapeutic intervention.
Therefore, a number of failed or faulty identifications result from trying to measure a radionuclide that is not included in the library of a particular instrument.
Doyle reported on 133 WISE participants with ischemic symptoms at Allegheny General Hospital who underwent baseline cardiac magnetic resonance perfusion imaging, radionuclide gated SPECT, and quantitative coronary angiography and were followed for 38 months.
The Atlantic Environmental Radiation Unit (AERU) was established in 1977 as a section within the Marine Chemistry Division at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography to conduct radionuclide research and to implement the Point Lepreau Environmental Monitoring Program (PLEMP) pursuant to an interdepartmental agreement on its objectives and purpose.
Assessment modelling tools, like MODARIA contribute to strengthening global efforts to control public exposure to radionuclides, which are or have been released into the environment, said Peter Johnston, Director of the IAEA Division of Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety.