radiolucent

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ra·di·o·lu·cent

(rā'dē-ō-lū'sĕnt),
Relatively penetrable by x-rays or other forms of radiation. Compare: radiopaque.
[radio- + L. lucens, shining]

radiolucent

/ra·dio·lu·cent/ (ra″de-o-loo´sent) permitting the passage of radiant energy, such as x-rays, with little attenuation, the representative areas appearing dark on the exposed film.

radiolucent

(rā′dē-ō-lo͞o′sənt)
adj.
Allowing the passage of x-rays or other radiation; not radiopaque.

ra′di·o·lu′cen·cy n.

radiolucent

[-lo̅o̅′sənt]
Etymology: L, radiare, to emit rays, lucere, to shine
pertaining to materials that allow x-rays to penetrate with a minimum of absorption.

radiolucent

adjective Referring to a material or tissue that allows the facile passage of X-rays (i.e., has an air or near-air density); radiolucent structures are black or near black on conventional X-rays

radiolucent

adjective Referring to a material or tissue that allows the facile passage of x-rays–ie, has an air or near air density; radiolucent structures are black or near black on conventional x-rays. Cf Radiopaque.

ra·di·o·lu·cent

(rā'dē-ō-lū'sĕnt)
Relatively penetrable by x-rays or other forms of radiation.
Compare: radiopaque
[radio- + L. lucens, shining]

radiolucent

offering minimal obstruction to passage of X-rays

ra·di·o·lu·cent

(rā'dē-ō-lū'sĕnt)
Relatively penetrable by x-rays or other forms of radiation.
[radio- + L. lucens, shining]

radiolucent (rā´dēōloo´sent),

adj permitting the passage of radiant energy, with relatively little attenuation by absorption. The image of radiolucent materials on a radiograph ranges from shades of gray to black.

radiolucent

permitting the passage of radiant energy, such as x-rays, yet offering some resistance to it, the representative areas appearing dark on the exposed film.
References in periodicals archive ?
The prevalence of pre-eruptive dentin radiolucencies in the permanent dentition.
Dentin radiolucencies in unerupted teeth: report of two cases.
A careful analysis was performed to determine if there were any progressive radiolucencies.
As well, zonal analysis did not reveal any progressive radiolucencies around any of the surviving femoral components.
Radiographic review showed no progressive radiolucencies or polyethylene fracture in either cohort.
Complications, Radiographic Radiolucencies, and Need for Transfusion
The radiographic follow-up indicated suboptimal fixation, with circumferential stem radiolucencies of both hips and eventual right hip femoral component migration.
Femoral radiolucencies, however, were symptomatic in only one patient from this series.
There were no patients with radiolucencies in all three DeLee and Charnley zones, nor were there any radiolucent lines greater than 2 mm wide in any zone.
Among the nonrevised shells, there were no patients with radiolucencies in all three DeLee and Charnley zones, nor were there any radiolucent lines greater than 2 mm wide in any zone at 5 years postoperatively (Table 2).
Stepwise linear regression revealed that low proximal migration was significantly associated with HA coating and few radiolucencies.