radiology


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radiology

 [ra″de-ol´ah-je]
the branch of medical science dealing with use of x-rays, radioactive substances, and other forms of radiant energy in diagnosis and treatment of disease. adj., adj radiolog´ic, radiolog´ical.
interventional radiology the branch of radiology concerned with providing diagnosis and treatment of disease by a variety of percutaneous procedures performed under the guidance of radiologic imaging.

ra·di·ol·o·gy

(rā'dē-ol'ŏ-jē),
1. The science of high-energy radiation and of the sources and the chemical, physical, and biologic effects of such radiation; the term usually refers to the diagnosis and treatment of disease.
2. The scientific discipline of medical imaging using ionizing radiation, radionuclides, nuclear magnetic resonance, and ultrasound. Synonym(s): diagnostic radiology
[radio- + G. logos, study]

radiology

/ra·di·ol·o·gy/ (ra″de-ol´ah-je) that branch of the health sciences dealing with radioactive substances and radiant energy and with the diagnosis and treatment of disease by means of both ionizing (e.g., x-rays) and nonionizing (e.g., ultrasound) radiation.radiolog´icradiolog´ical

radiology

(rā′dē-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The branch of medicine that deals with diagnostic images of anatomic structures made through the use of electromagnetic radiation or sound waves and that treats disease through the use of radioactive compounds. Radiological imaging techniques include x-rays, CT scans, PET scans, MRIs, and ultrasonograms.
2. The use of radiation for the scientific examination of material structures; radioscopy.

ra′di·o·log′i·cal (-ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl), ra′di·o·log′ic (-lŏj′ĭk) adj.
ra′di·o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
ra′di·ol′o·gist n.

radiology

[-ol′əjē]
Etymology: L, radius + logos, science
the branch of medicine concerned with radioactive substances and with the diagnosis and treatment of disease by visualizing any of the various sources of radiant energy. Three subbranches of radiology are diagnostic radiology, imaging using external sources of radiation; nuclear medicine, imaging radioactive materials that are placed into body organs; and therapeutic radiology, the treatment of cancer using radiation. Formerly called roentgenology. radiologic, radiological, adj.

radiology

Roentgenology The use of ionizing–eg, x-rays, and nonionizing–eg, ultrasound and MRI–radiation, to diagnose and treat disease. See Interventional radiology, Teleradiology.

ra·di·ol·o·gy

(rā'dē-ol'ŏ-jē)
1. The science of high-energy radiation and of the sources and the chemical, physical, and biologic effects of such radiation; the term usually refers to the diagnosis and treatment of disease.
2. The scientific discipline of medical imaging using ionizing radiation, radionuclides, nuclear magnetic resonance, and ultrasound.
Synonym(s): diagnostic radiology.
[radio- + G. logos, study]

radiology

The medical specialty concerned with the use of RADIATION for diagnosis and treatment. See also RADIOTHERAPY.

radiology

the medical specialty covering the use and interpretation of X-ray images and, more recently, other imaging techniques.

radiology (rā·dē·ˑ·l·jē),

n 1. the science of radiation; the sources of radiation; and the biological, physical, and chemical effects of radiation.
2. medical imaging using radiation, radionuclides, nuclear magnetic resonance, and ultrasound for treating illness.

radiology 

A science dealing with techniques that use radiant energy (e.g. X-rays) for diagnosis and therapy. See fluorescein angiography; magnetic resonance imaging; computed tomography.

ra·di·ol·o·gy

(rā'dē-ol'ŏ-jē)
1. Science of high-energy radiation and of sources and chemical, physical, and biologic effects of such radiation.
2. Scientific discipline of medical imaging.
Synonym(s): diagnostic radiology.
[radio- + G. logos, study]

radiology (rā´dēol´əjē),

n 1. the branch of medicine dealing with the diagnostic and therapeutic applications of ionizing radiation.
n 2. the science of radiant energy, its use toward the extension of present knowledge, and its diverse beneficial applications.
radiology, oral,
n all phases of the science and art of radiology that are of interest to the dental profession. Oral radiology involves the generation and application of roentgen rays for the purpose of recording shadow images of teeth and their supporting tissues, adjacent regions, and associated parts. It also includes the interpretation of the radiographic findings.

radiology

the branch of science dealing with use of x-rays, radioactive substances, and other forms of radiant energy in diagnosis and treatment of disease.

veterinary radiology
dealing with the diseases of animals by radiological methods.
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