radioisotope

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radioisotope

 [ra″de-o-i´so-tōp]
a radioactive form of an element, consisting of atoms with unstable nuclei, which undergo radioactive decay to stable forms, emitting characteristic alpha, beta, or gamma radiation. These may occur naturally, as in the cases of radium and uranium, or may be created artificially. Scientists create artificial radioisotopes by bombarding stable atoms of an element with subatomic particles in a nuclear reactor or in an atom smasher, or cyclotron. When the nucleus of a stable atom is charged by bombarding particles, the atom usually becomes unstable, or radioactive, and is said to be “labeled” or “tagged.” See also radiation therapy.

ra·di·o·i·so·tope

(rā'dē-ō-ī'sō-tōp),
An isotope that changes to a more stable state by emitting radiation.

radioisotope

/ra·dio·iso·tope/ (-i´so-tōp) a radioactive isotope; one having an unstable nucleus and emitting characteristic radiation during its decay to a stable form.

radioisotope

[rā′dē·ō·ī′sətōp]
Etymology: L, radius + Gk, isos, equal, topos, place
a radioactive form of an element, which may be used for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes.

ra·di·o·i·so·tope

(rā'dē-ō-ī'sŏ-tōp)
An isotope that changes to a more stable state by emitting radiation.

radioisotope

see ISOTOPE.

Radioisotope

A chemical tagged with radioactive compounds that is injected during a nuclear medicine procedure to highlight organ or tissue.

ra·di·o·i·so·tope

(rā'dē-ō-ī'sŏ-tōp)
An isotope that changes to a more stable state by emitting radiation.

radioisotope (rā´dēōī´sōtōp),

n a chemical element that has been made radioactive through bombardment of neutrons in a cyclotron or atomic pile or found in a natural state.

radioisotope

a radioactive form of an element. A radioisotope consists of unstable atoms that undergo radioactive decay emitting alpha, beta or gamma radiation. Radioisotopes occur naturally, as in the cases of radium and uranium, or may be created artificially. See also radionuclide.
Artificial radioisotopes are created by bombarding stable atoms of an element with subatomic particles in a nuclear reactor or in an atom smasher, or cyclotron. When the nucleus of a stable atom is charged by bombarding particles, the atom usually becomes unstable, or radioactive, and is said to be 'labeled' or 'tagged'.

radioisotope organ scanning
injection of an isotope and scanning of organs in which the isotope is planned to locate, e.g. radioactive iodine in the thyroid gland.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fuji's family of scientific imaging systems products and technologies-including chemiluminescent, fluorescent, and radioisotopic detection-are tailored to suit many different applications for a variety of scientific analyses and imaging environments.
NanoScintillation Systems may also have applications in other areas such as in radioisotopic binding assays and in functional genomics whereby the binding of radiolabeled probes in DNA microarrays can be quantified which may be of particular interest to biomedical researchers who build their own gene chips and need high sensitivity detection.
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Jordan's invention of Radioisotopic thermoelectric generators for spacecraft.
At terrestrial altitudes, the predominant sources of radiation include both cosmic rays and alpha particle radiation from radioisotopic impurities in the package and chip materials.
1-kb fragment derived by the locus-specific primer is directly subjected to TaqI digestion and is analyzed on an agarose gel without radioisotopic hybridization.
North American Scientific develops, produces and sells innovative radioisotopic products, including brachytherapy seeds and radiopharmaceuticals, principally for the treatment and diagnosis of disease.
The use of a radioisotopic method estimation of galactose-1-phosphate in galactosemia.
For IAAs, a radioisotopic method that calculates the displaceable insulin radioligand binding after the addition of excess nonradiolabeled insulin (226) is recommended.
Along the way, the development of monoclonal antibodies, availability of receptors, and the reluctance to use radioisotopic tracers have been driving forces in the development of this sector of diagnostics.
Sensitivity and dynamic range were explored with clonal mixtures and with patient samples in which the percentage of the A3243G mutation was quantified by radioisotopic end-cycle labeling (13).