radioisotope


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Related to radioisotope: Radioisotope thermoelectric generator, Radioisotope dating

radioisotope

 [ra″de-o-i´so-tōp]
a radioactive form of an element, consisting of atoms with unstable nuclei, which undergo radioactive decay to stable forms, emitting characteristic alpha, beta, or gamma radiation. These may occur naturally, as in the cases of radium and uranium, or may be created artificially. Scientists create artificial radioisotopes by bombarding stable atoms of an element with subatomic particles in a nuclear reactor or in an atom smasher, or cyclotron. When the nucleus of a stable atom is charged by bombarding particles, the atom usually becomes unstable, or radioactive, and is said to be “labeled” or “tagged.” See also radiation therapy.

ra·di·o·i·so·tope

(rā'dē-ō-ī'sō-tōp),
An isotope that changes to a more stable state by emitting radiation.

radioisotope

/ra·dio·iso·tope/ (-i´so-tōp) a radioactive isotope; one having an unstable nucleus and emitting characteristic radiation during its decay to a stable form.

radioisotope

[rā′dē·ō·ī′sətōp]
Etymology: L, radius + Gk, isos, equal, topos, place
a radioactive form of an element, which may be used for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes.

ra·di·o·i·so·tope

(rā'dē-ō-ī'sŏ-tōp)
An isotope that changes to a more stable state by emitting radiation.

radioisotope

see ISOTOPE.

Radioisotope

A chemical tagged with radioactive compounds that is injected during a nuclear medicine procedure to highlight organ or tissue.

ra·di·o·i·so·tope

(rā'dē-ō-ī'sŏ-tōp)
An isotope that changes to a more stable state by emitting radiation.

radioisotope (rā´dēōī´sōtōp),

n a chemical element that has been made radioactive through bombardment of neutrons in a cyclotron or atomic pile or found in a natural state.

radioisotope

a radioactive form of an element. A radioisotope consists of unstable atoms that undergo radioactive decay emitting alpha, beta or gamma radiation. Radioisotopes occur naturally, as in the cases of radium and uranium, or may be created artificially. See also radionuclide.
Artificial radioisotopes are created by bombarding stable atoms of an element with subatomic particles in a nuclear reactor or in an atom smasher, or cyclotron. When the nucleus of a stable atom is charged by bombarding particles, the atom usually becomes unstable, or radioactive, and is said to be 'labeled' or 'tagged'.

radioisotope organ scanning
injection of an isotope and scanning of organs in which the isotope is planned to locate, e.g. radioactive iodine in the thyroid gland.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the process, these so-called parent radioisotopes transform, or decay, into daughter isotopes containing different numbers of protons and neutrons.
Also it is possible to detect increased uptake of radioisotope in the elbow join area according to abnormalities.
In traditional radioimmunoimaging (RAII), radioisotopes are linked directly to antibodies and are delivered together to tumour targets.
Conclusions: Intradermal radioisotope injection for SLN identification appears to be a highly accurate technique with acceptable false-negative and SLN identification rates.
The General Electric Company, for decades the manufacturer of the plutonium-fueled radioisotope thermoelectric generators, pushed for their use.
The use of radioisotope techniques for problem-solving is increasing steadily as more and more potential applications are identified.
B14 for Tc(99m) Radioisotopes - Tc99m is an important radiochemical that is used in more than 90% of radiodiagnostic procedures.
NNSA has partnered with SHINE Medical Technologies and NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes since 2010.
The ITM Group is a privately held group of specialized radiopharmaceutical companies dedicated to the development of innovative radioisotopes, radiopharmaceuticals and next generation radiomedical devices.
As respective experts on radioisotope uptake in marine life and tuna migration patterns, Nicholas Fisher of Stony Brook University and Daniel Madigan of Stanford's Hopkins Marine Station knew that young bluefins caught off California during the summer of 2011 likely would have spent their early days in contaminated waters off Fukushima.
physicians employ radioisotopes in an estimated 13 million nuclear-medicine procedures and another 100 million laboratory tests.
Molybdenum-99 is a radioisotope primarily produced from the nuclear fission of Uranium-235 using neutron bombardment.