radiogram

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radiograph

 [ra´de-o-graf″]
an image or record produced on exposed or processed film by radiography.
Relative positions of x-ray tube, patient, and film necessary to make the radiograph shown. Bones tend to stop diagnostic x-rays, but soft tissue does not. This results in the light and dark regions that form the image. From Thompson et al., 1994.
bite-wing radiograph a type of dental radiograph that reveals the crowns, necks, and coronal thirds of the roots of both the upper and lower posterior teeth, as well as the dental arches, produced using bite-wing film.
cephalometric radiograph a radiograph of the head, including the mandible, in full lateral view; used to make measurements; called also cephalogram.
flat plate radiograph a radiograph that visualizes abdominal organs and some abnormalities. It is usually one of the first diagnostic studies performed in assessing a patient for gastrointestinal disorders; no special physical preparation of the patient is necessary.
panoramic radiograph a type of extraoral body-section radiograph on which the entire maxilla or mandible can be depicted on a single film.

ra·di·o·gram

(rā'dē-ō-gram'),
Obsolete term for radiograph.
[radio- + G. gramma, something written]

radiogram

/ra·dio·gram/ (-gram″) radiograph.

radiogram

(rā′dē-ō-grăm′)
n.
1. A message transmitted by wireless telegraphy.

radiogram (rā´dēōgram),

radiogram

radiograph.
References in periodicals archive ?
Best of all, however, was the fact that, alone of the three houses, ours possessed a radiogramophone, or radiogram as they were colloquially called.
So, on radiograms of powders of the alloys with scandium, especially with a highest content (Figure 3), near reflexes of [psi]- and [beta]-phases system of additional low-intensity lines was registered at diffraction angles 20.
I had been writing in 'Lost Tribes' about those days when we used to go to a special shop to get an accumulator, a giant battery that powered the old Radiograms and radios, long before electricity was par for the course in every property.
What about electric cookers that blow up on installation, radiograms, radios, electric irons etc that the manufacturers are so apathetic about?
He sold washing machines that looked like spacecraft, wireless sets as big as wardrobes, radiograms that would fill a bungalow and kitchen stoves that could sink a battleship.
He amassed more than 500 radios, telephones, phonographs, gramophones, radiograms, record players, crystal sets, and TVs dating from the end of the 19th Century to the 1970s.
Typical signs of osteoarthritis (OA) (irregular narrowing of joint spaces, subchondral sclerosis, and sclerotic cyst formation) were seen on hand radiograms (Figure 1).
This was back in the early 1950s when we were still using giant re-chargeable batteries known as 'accumulators' to provide the power to play music on the old radiograms, high tech in their day
A police sergeant and constable were remanded for allegedly breaking into a store and stealing radiograms.
Hi-fi with its separate speakers was in its infancy and radiograms, in stout wooden cabinets, were still all the rage.