radiocarbon


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ra·di·o·car·bon

(rā'dē-ō-kar'bŏn),
A radioactive isotope of carbon, for example, 14C.

radiocarbon

Any of the radionuclides of carbon, the most common of which are 11C, which has a half-life of 20 minutes, and the beta-emitting 14C, which has a half-life of 5,730 years and is used to date archaeological, geological and hydrogeological material.

radiocarbon

(rā″dē-ō-kăr′bŏn)
A radioisotope of carbon; 11C and 14C are used in medical studies.
References in periodicals archive ?
Both samples were submitted to the National Ocean Sciences Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Facility (NOSAMS) at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, for routine radiocarbon analyses.
The first application of bomb radiocarbon dating to validate ages in long-lived sharks addressed the porbeagle (Latona nasus) and, preliminarily, the shortfin mako (Isurus oxyrinchus; Campana et al.
But the Low-Radiocarb(TM) Diet, which includes low-radiocarbon protein, amino acids and nucleotides made by special new processes, gives future children the opportunity to permanently build DNA in critical brain and heart cells with up to 99% less radiocarbon than the rest of us have.
Radiocarbon dating, also known as carbon-14 dating, is a technique that can accurately determine the age of organic material.
Willard Libby is mentioned in passing but his development of the radiocarbon technique is not narrated.
Plants, which obtain their carbon from carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, will have the same proportion of radiocarbon, as will animals which, in turn, obtain their carbon from the plants or other animals that they eat.
Most readers are familiar with 'contamination' of radiocarbon samples, usually by materials younger than the true sample age.
More specifically, it examines the metrological revolutions, or at least evolutionary milestones that have marked the history of radiocarbon dating, since its inception some 50 years ago, to the present.
At that time Arbogast and Loope (1999) and Loope and Arbogast (2000) obtained radiocarbon dates from paleosols exposed in dunes along the eastern shore in order to study the timing of dune activity.
For more than fifty years, radiocarbon dating has provided North American archaeologists with a powerful measure of time.
It is impossible to do justice to this exhaustive and highly controversial volume in a brief review, even if one were an expert in radiocarbon statistics, which I cannot claim to be.
To estimate the date of Jericho's destruction, Bruins and van der Plicht compared the radiocarbon dates of grains excavated from the debris to a more precise date for the Thera eruption that is based on counting tree rings.