radiobiology

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radiobiology

 [ra″de-o-bi-ol´ah-je]
the branch of science concerned with effects of light and of ultraviolet and ionizing radiations on living tissue or organisms. adj., adj radiobiolog´ical.

ra·di·o·bi·ol·o·gy

(rā'dē-ō-bī-ol'ŏ-jē),
The study of the biologic effects of ionizing radiation upon living tissue. Cf. radiopathology.

radiobiology

/ra·dio·bi·ol·o·gy/ (-bi-ol´ah-je) the branch of science concerned with effects of light and of ultraviolet and ionizing radiations on living tissue or organisms.radiobiolog´ical

radiobiology

(rā′dē-ō-bī-ŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The study of the effects of radiation on living organisms.
2. The use of radioactive tracers to study biological processes.

ra′di·o·bi′o·log′i·cal (-ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
ra′di·o·bi·ol′o·gist n.

radiobiology

[-bī·ol′əjē]
Etymology: L, radius + Gk, bios, life, logos, science
the branch of the natural sciences dealing with the effects of radiation on biological systems. radiobiologic, radiobiological, adj.

ra·di·o·bi·ol·o·gy

(rā'dē-ō-bī-ol'ŏ-jē)
The study of the biologic effects of ionizing radiation on living tissue. Cf. radiopathology.

radiobiology

The study of the effects of radiation, especially ionizing radiation, on living organisms.

ra·di·o·bi·ol·o·gy

(rā'dē-ō-bī-ol'ŏ-jē)
The study of the biologic effects of ionizing radiation on living tissue. Cf. radiopathology.

radiobiology,

n the branch of the natural sciences dealing with the effects of radiation on biologic systems.

radiobiology

the branch of science concerned with effects of light and of ultraviolet and ionizing radiations on living tissue or organisms. See also radiotherapy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Given the radiobiologic plausibility of radiation-induced CLL, one would expect that the conclusion that CLL is nonradiogenic would be supported by a strong, consistent body of epidemiologic evidence indicating that CLL is an exception to the general principles of radiation carcinogenesis.
alpha particles, gamma rays, neutrons) have different radiobiologic properties, and tissues and organs have different radiation sensitivities [United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) 2000].
Regulatory decision-makers need to consider carefully what weighting factors should be used to address radiobiologic effectiveness of different radiation types and radiosensitivity differences in tissues and organs.