nucleic acid probe

(redirected from radioactive probe)

nu·cle·ic ac·id probe

a nucleic acid fragment, labeled by a radioisotope, biotin, and the like, which is complementary to a sequence in another nucleic acid (fragment) and that will, by hydrogen binding to the latter, locate or identify it and be detected; a diagnostic technique based on the fact that every species of microbe possesses some unique nucleic acid sequences that differentiate it from all others, and thus can be used as identifying markers or "fingerprints."

nucleic acid probe

(noo-klē′ik, nū-)
A labelled single-strand of DNA used to detect complementary DNA in a laboratory specimen.

nucleic acid probe

see PROBE.
References in periodicals archive ?
The main objective of the CERAD project is to improve and expand the research infrastructure located at the National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ), utilized in research programs oriented at design and pre-clinical evaluation of new drugs carrying the radioactive probe (radio pharmaceuticals) and other multimodality probes, suitable for diagnostic or therapeutic application, with the particular focus on the biologically active carrier molecules which can be traced at the cellular and molecular level
This was not possible really (with a radioactive probe) because to detect something that is labeled with a radioactive probe, especially if it is imaging type of detection, you have to put it on a film and where the radioactive probe is would make a black dot.
There are many of them, they are much less dangerous and poisonous than radioactive probes, and they have many colors, and they allow the detection of many things simultaneously because of the different colors.
We hypothesize that targeting elevated VPAC1 with gene guided radioactive probe for molecular imaging of PC will permit us to contribute toward this need.
4] assays having a radioactive probe is limited (3).
His group developed a radioactive probe, made up of short sequences, that could latch onto those repeating sequences and ultimately reveal patterns that were unique to each individual: a DNA "fingerprint" (5).
In the 1970s, researchers developed the first positron emission tomography scanner, a machine that could track molecular activity in the brain using radioactive probes.
Radioactive probes have been developed for this application but are not routinely used.
Le Moine, the author of the chapter on in situ hybridization using radioactive probes to study gene expression, acknowledges that "the entire procedure is quite complicated" (page 152).
Making radioactive probes requires expensive machinery.
And importantly, the technology is non-invasive and does not involve radioactive probes or radiological procedures.
These are arranged according to length by electrophoresis, and then the ones that contain repeat sequences are tagged with radioactive probes, which allow these fragments to be visualized.

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