radioactive isotope


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isotope

 [i´so-tōp]
a chemical element having the same atomic number as another (i.e., the same number of nuclear protons), but having a different atomic mass (i.e., a different number of nuclear neutrons).
radioactive isotope radioisotope.
stable isotope one that does not transmute into another element with emission of corpuscular or electromagnetic radiations.

ra·di·o·ac·tive i·so·tope

an isotope with an unstable nuclear composition; such nuclei decompose spontaneously by emission of a nuclear electron (β particle) or helium nucleus (α particle) and radiation (γ rays), thus achieving a stable nuclear composition; used as tracers and as radiation and energy sources. See: half-life.

radioactive isotope

Radionuclide, see there.

radioactive isotope

see ISOTOPE.

Radioactive isotope

One of two or more atoms with the same number of protons but a different number of neutrons with a nuclear composition. In nuclear scanning, radioactive isotopes are used as a diagnostic agent.

radioactive isotope,

isotope

a chemical element having the same atomic number as another (i.e. the same number of nuclear protons), but having a different atomic mass (i.e. a different number of nuclear neutrons).

radioactive isotope
one having an unstable nucleus and which emits characteristic radiation during its decay to a stable form. See also radioisotope.
stable isotope
one that does not transmute into another element with emission of corpuscular or electromagnetic radiations.

radioactive

characterized by radioactivity.

radioactive decay
spontaneous decomposition of the nuclei of the atoms of radioactive substances. Measured as the proportion of the atoms in a radionuclide that decompose per unit of time, usually stated as the half-life of that particular isotope.
radioactive fallout
dissemination of radioactive substances through the atmosphere and deposition on the environment generally; causes radiation injury.
radioactive isotope
radionuclide. A radioactive nuclide, e.g. radioactive iodine or strontium.
radioactive tracer
see radioactive tracer.
References in periodicals archive ?
An insider said: "There is no margin for error when you are dealing with radioactive isotopes.
Although the trend is toward the low-powered tubes, some instrument suppliers maintain that having the option of a radioactive isotope can come in handy.
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Beryllium-10, a radioactive isotope, is produced in cosmic ray showers.
Brachytherapy seeds containing the radioactive isotope Iodine-125 were first implanted into a cancer patient in 1967 and patented by the father of IsoRay Medical, Don Lawrence.
8 NATURE, Beers and his colleagues report finding a second radioactive isotope, uranium-238, in a metal-poor star located on the outskirts of the Milky Way.
Tuesday's implant is among the first in the world using the radioactive isotope using this new isotope developed for LDR (low dose radiation) brachytherapy seed treatment.
Martin Brechbiel had promising results indicating that a radioactive isotope called bismuth-212 could destroy cancers in laboratory animals.
This implant procedure marks one of the first brachytherapy seed implants in the world to utilize the radioactive isotope Cesium-131.
The analysis identifies the radioactive isotope aluminum-26 as the heat source that melted these primitive rocks.
SEATTLE -- A new isotope for low-dose (LDR) seed brachytherapy was implanted into a prostate cancer patient at the University of Washington Medical Center today, marking the first brachytherapy seed implant in the world utilizing the radioactive isotope Cesium-131.
The agreement on research and development aims to enable production of an essential radioactive isotope used in millions of medical diagnostic imaging procedures every year.

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