radical

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radical

 [rad´ĭ-kal]
1. thorough or sweeping; directed to the cause or root of a morbid process.
2. a group of atoms that enters into and goes out of chemical combination without change and that forms one of the fundamental constituents of a molecule.
color radical chromophore.
free radical a radical that carries an unpaired electron; such radicals are extremely reactive, with a very short half-life.
oxygen radical a toxic metabolite of oxygen, such as superoxide or singlet oxygen, capable of damaging microorganisms and normal tissues.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl), Do not confuse this word with radicle.
1. In chemistry, a group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (for example, methyl, CH3); in chemical formulas, a radical is often distinguished by being enclosed in parentheses or brackets.
2. Thorough or extensive; relating or directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process; for example, a radical operation.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
4. Synonym(s): free radical
5. A functional group in a molecule or molecular entity.
[L. radix (radic-), root]

radical

/rad·i·cal/ (rad´ĭ-k'l)
1. directed to the root or cause; designed to eliminate all possible extensions of a morbid process.
2. a group of atoms that enters and goes out of chemical combination without change.

free radical  a radical that carries an unpaired electron; such radicals are extremely reactive, with a very short half-life.

radical

(răd′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Departing markedly from the usual or customary; extreme or drastic: a radical change in diet.
2. Medicine Relating to or being surgery that is extreme or drastic in an effort to eradicate all existing or potential disease: radical hysterectomy.
3. Botany
a. Of, relating to, or arising from a root: radical hairs.
b. Arising from the base of a stem or from a below-ground stem or rhizome: radical leaves.

rad′i·cal·ly adv.
rad′i·cal·ness n.

radical

[rad′ikəl]
Etymology: L, radix, root
1 n, an atom or group of atoms that contains an unpaired electron. A radical does not exist freely in nature except for O2, NO, and NO2.
2 adj, pertaining to drastic therapy, such as the surgical removal of an organ, limb, or other part of the body.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl)
1. chemistry A group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (e.g., methyl, CH3); in chemical formulas, a radical is often distinguished by being enclosed in parentheses or brackets.
2. Directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process, e.g., a radical operation.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
4. Synonym(s): free radical.
[L. radix (radic-), root]

radical

(of plants) arising from the root or crown.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl)
1. In chemistry, a group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (e.g., methyl, CH3).
2. Thorough or extensive; relating or directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
[L. radix (radic-), root]

radical,

n 1. a group of atoms that acts together and forms a component of a compound. The group tends to remain bound together when a chemical reaction removes it from one compound and attaches it to another compound. A radical does not exist freely in nature.
adj 2. a drastic measure to cure or prevent the spread of a serious disease, such as the surgical removal of an organ, limb, or other body part.

radical

1. directed to the cause; going to the root or source of a morbid process.
2. a group of atoms that enters into and goes out of chemical combination without change and that forms one of the fundamental constituents of a molecule.

free radical
a radical, extremely reactive, and having a very short half-life (10−5 s or less in an aqueous solution), which carries an unpaired electron.
References in periodicals archive ?
2002; Chen and Liu 2005), or radicalness of design (Tidd 1995; Atuahene-Gima 2005) may moderate the effect of supplier innovativeness on manufacturer performance.
Missing is the radicalness of the God of Jesus, the God who so loves the world that he dies on the cross for all humanity, the father of the prodigal son (Lk 15:11-31), and the God whose radical gift of self in Jesus Christ makes us more and invites us to be more.
The explorer scale items focus on the key elements frequently associated with this construct in the literature: newness, radicalness, and creativity of ideas, technologies and products (March, 1991; Levinthal and March, 1993; Bierly and Chakrabarti, 1996; Zack, 1999).
It is easy to forget the radicalness of Interior Scroll, 1975, for instance, in which a naked, mud-painted Schneemann pulled a text from her vagina and read its eloquent protest against a male-dominated art world.
As such the modern world is in a situation of radical crisis, one in which the proletariat has "nothing to lose but its changes, "the very radicalness of this crisis being what both permits an escape from ideology to achieve a transcendent understanding of the whole historical process and that heralds the realization of the communist world.
Further proof that Husserl distinguishes the Cartesian picture of reality from Descartes's specific version of it comes later in the introduction, where Husserl says that his work "reawakens the impulse of the Cartesian Meditations: not to adopt their content but, in not doing so, to renew with greater intensity the radicalness of their spirit" (see Cartesian Meditations, 6).
The conclusion throws up a number of provocative claims: that movies have "an excess of mimesis over meaning" (258); that the narcissism of classic identification is exceeded by the importance and radicalness of "wanting something back from the image" that goes beyond identification and mirroring; that "the race movie anthem was that blacks were better than whites" (269).
But in this child born 2,000 years ago they find solace, pride, the radicalness of God's esteem for them, and a wild madness that gives them hope not only for the future but, in the midst of persecution and pain, for the present.
Nonetheless, radicalness is--much like the tactical oppositions of resistance in the workplace--by its very nature ephemeral, nomadic, and opportunistic.
The radicalness of the situation might be more concretely understood by imagining that some Western economy would suddenly be forced to bring its OECD trade to a virtual end and then socialize its enterprise sector and ownership.
In contrast to functional diversity, which affects stakeholders' (but not team members') evaluations of the team's innovativeness, a team's predominant problem-solving approach shapes its members' (but not stakeholders') perception of the team's innovative behaviors and radicalness.