radical

(redirected from radically)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

radical

 [rad´ĭ-kal]
1. thorough or sweeping; directed to the cause or root of a morbid process.
2. a group of atoms that enters into and goes out of chemical combination without change and that forms one of the fundamental constituents of a molecule.
color radical chromophore.
free radical a radical that carries an unpaired electron; such radicals are extremely reactive, with a very short half-life.
oxygen radical a toxic metabolite of oxygen, such as superoxide or singlet oxygen, capable of damaging microorganisms and normal tissues.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl), Do not confuse this word with radicle.
1. In chemistry, a group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (for example, methyl, CH3); in chemical formulas, a radical is often distinguished by being enclosed in parentheses or brackets.
2. Thorough or extensive; relating or directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process; for example, a radical operation.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
4. Synonym(s): free radical
5. A functional group in a molecule or molecular entity.
[L. radix (radic-), root]

radical

/rad·i·cal/ (rad´ĭ-k'l)
1. directed to the root or cause; designed to eliminate all possible extensions of a morbid process.
2. a group of atoms that enters and goes out of chemical combination without change.

free radical  a radical that carries an unpaired electron; such radicals are extremely reactive, with a very short half-life.

radical

(răd′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Departing markedly from the usual or customary; extreme or drastic: a radical change in diet.
2. Medicine Relating to or being surgery that is extreme or drastic in an effort to eradicate all existing or potential disease: radical hysterectomy.
3. Botany
a. Of, relating to, or arising from a root: radical hairs.
b. Arising from the base of a stem or from a below-ground stem or rhizome: radical leaves.

rad′i·cal·ly adv.
rad′i·cal·ness n.

radical

[rad′ikəl]
Etymology: L, radix, root
1 n, an atom or group of atoms that contains an unpaired electron. A radical does not exist freely in nature except for O2, NO, and NO2.
2 adj, pertaining to drastic therapy, such as the surgical removal of an organ, limb, or other part of the body.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl)
1. chemistry A group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (e.g., methyl, CH3); in chemical formulas, a radical is often distinguished by being enclosed in parentheses or brackets.
2. Directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process, e.g., a radical operation.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
4. Synonym(s): free radical.
[L. radix (radic-), root]

radical

(of plants) arising from the root or crown.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl)
1. In chemistry, a group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (e.g., methyl, CH3).
2. Thorough or extensive; relating or directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
[L. radix (radic-), root]

radical,

n 1. a group of atoms that acts together and forms a component of a compound. The group tends to remain bound together when a chemical reaction removes it from one compound and attaches it to another compound. A radical does not exist freely in nature.
adj 2. a drastic measure to cure or prevent the spread of a serious disease, such as the surgical removal of an organ, limb, or other body part.

radical

1. directed to the cause; going to the root or source of a morbid process.
2. a group of atoms that enters into and goes out of chemical combination without change and that forms one of the fundamental constituents of a molecule.

free radical
a radical, extremely reactive, and having a very short half-life (10−5 s or less in an aqueous solution), which carries an unpaired electron.
References in periodicals archive ?
What is the feasibility of radically simplifying EFC determination for different categories of students, like dependent and independent students?
A four step-system for long-term survival includes: establishing a risk-based early-warning system; radically refocusing performance reporting and analysis; replacing the annual planning process with a repeatable, short-cycle tactical-based process; and recapturing intuition as a factor in decision-making.
Otsuka attempts to show that the radically egalitarian redistribution he favors is intuitively plausible if you share his intuitions (which many people will not); that he is entitled to call himself a Lockean after he has reformulated Locke's ideas sufficiently that they have "been fully cleansed of the regressive ideological commitments of Locke's (and more recent) times"; and that as a "Lockean" he is committed to fully consensual government, so long as a nonconsensual super-government is around to make sure that nothing bad happens.
Although the problematics of presenting work that often first existed as live performance are innumerable, Jonas's present a second complication since many of them also already incorporate elements of prerecorded video--there precisely to disturb any smooth conception of continuously unfolding time and perhaps more radically to point to space as a tangible medium, one that might be reoriented or displaced to show its otherwise hidden folds.
Arnold Schwarzenegger has set a March 1 deadline for legislators to deliver "real" reform of California's costly workers' compensation system, threatening to bring his own proposals to radically cut costs directly to voters in a November ballot initiative if state lawmakers fail to respond to the challenge.
That thesis, briefly stated, is that we thoroughly misunderstand ancient philosophy when we take it to be the elaboration of intellectual "systems," because its essence is above all the choice, practice, and justification of a radically transforming way of life.
Just as personal computers and the Internet radically changed our work and commercial life, digitization will radically change health care--in ways we can't even imagine.
This method uses a radically different, high-contrast mechanism that provides information that is unobtainable using conventional x-ray imaging techniques.
The initial steps would comprise the identification of a radically different biologically induced adhesion, identification of the required fiber type and modification, and development of self-organizing nano-structures to lead to a composite design.
Did the proro-industrial or industrialization process radically affect family relations?
At the same time, it is all too easy to identify God only as the source of strength in our sufferings, the radically immanent God present in the human kindness that ministers to us, a God who bears no responsibility for evil and pain.