radical

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radical

 [rad´ĭ-kal]
1. thorough or sweeping; directed to the cause or root of a morbid process.
2. a group of atoms that enters into and goes out of chemical combination without change and that forms one of the fundamental constituents of a molecule.
color radical chromophore.
free radical a radical that carries an unpaired electron; such radicals are extremely reactive, with a very short half-life.
oxygen radical a toxic metabolite of oxygen, such as superoxide or singlet oxygen, capable of damaging microorganisms and normal tissues.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl), Do not confuse this word with radicle.
1. In chemistry, a group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (for example, methyl, CH3); in chemical formulas, a radical is often distinguished by being enclosed in parentheses or brackets.
2. Thorough or extensive; relating or directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process; for example, a radical operation.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
4. Synonym(s): free radical
5. A functional group in a molecule or molecular entity.
[L. radix (radic-), root]

radical

/rad·i·cal/ (rad´ĭ-k'l)
1. directed to the root or cause; designed to eliminate all possible extensions of a morbid process.
2. a group of atoms that enters and goes out of chemical combination without change.

free radical  a radical that carries an unpaired electron; such radicals are extremely reactive, with a very short half-life.

radical

(răd′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Departing markedly from the usual or customary; extreme or drastic: a radical change in diet.
2. Medicine Relating to or being surgery that is extreme or drastic in an effort to eradicate all existing or potential disease: radical hysterectomy.
3. Botany
a. Of, relating to, or arising from a root: radical hairs.
b. Arising from the base of a stem or from a below-ground stem or rhizome: radical leaves.

rad′i·cal·ly adv.
rad′i·cal·ness n.

radical

[rad′ikəl]
Etymology: L, radix, root
1 n, an atom or group of atoms that contains an unpaired electron. A radical does not exist freely in nature except for O2, NO, and NO2.
2 adj, pertaining to drastic therapy, such as the surgical removal of an organ, limb, or other part of the body.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl)
1. chemistry A group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (e.g., methyl, CH3); in chemical formulas, a radical is often distinguished by being enclosed in parentheses or brackets.
2. Directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process, e.g., a radical operation.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
4. Synonym(s): free radical.
[L. radix (radic-), root]

radical

(of plants) arising from the root or crown.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl)
1. In chemistry, a group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (e.g., methyl, CH3).
2. Thorough or extensive; relating or directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
[L. radix (radic-), root]

radical,

n 1. a group of atoms that acts together and forms a component of a compound. The group tends to remain bound together when a chemical reaction removes it from one compound and attaches it to another compound. A radical does not exist freely in nature.
adj 2. a drastic measure to cure or prevent the spread of a serious disease, such as the surgical removal of an organ, limb, or other body part.

radical

1. directed to the cause; going to the root or source of a morbid process.
2. a group of atoms that enters into and goes out of chemical combination without change and that forms one of the fundamental constituents of a molecule.

free radical
a radical, extremely reactive, and having a very short half-life (10−5 s or less in an aqueous solution), which carries an unpaired electron.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus the story of nineteenth-century radicalism, in this view, is one of unrequited popular appeal, in which ordinary people resisted the wiles of the radicals, who were thereby revealed as marginal individuals, "enrages and bellicose crackpots,' "wild men," and so on (pp.
For all the useful detail Wegert presents from the archives, therefore, his account is profoundly flawed on the ground he believes himself to be most significantly addressing, that of the relationship between radicalism and the aspiration to national leadership (intermittently expressed in Wegert's account as "High Politics") on the one hand, and the mundane concerns of the masses on the other.