radical

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radical

 [rad´ĭ-kal]
1. thorough or sweeping; directed to the cause or root of a morbid process.
2. a group of atoms that enters into and goes out of chemical combination without change and that forms one of the fundamental constituents of a molecule.
color radical chromophore.
free radical a radical that carries an unpaired electron; such radicals are extremely reactive, with a very short half-life.
oxygen radical a toxic metabolite of oxygen, such as superoxide or singlet oxygen, capable of damaging microorganisms and normal tissues.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl), Do not confuse this word with radicle.
1. In chemistry, a group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (for example, methyl, CH3); in chemical formulas, a radical is often distinguished by being enclosed in parentheses or brackets.
2. Thorough or extensive; relating or directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process; for example, a radical operation.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
4. Synonym(s): free radical
5. A functional group in a molecule or molecular entity.
[L. radix (radic-), root]

radical

/rad·i·cal/ (rad´ĭ-k'l)
1. directed to the root or cause; designed to eliminate all possible extensions of a morbid process.
2. a group of atoms that enters and goes out of chemical combination without change.

free radical  a radical that carries an unpaired electron; such radicals are extremely reactive, with a very short half-life.

radical

(răd′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Departing markedly from the usual or customary; extreme or drastic: a radical change in diet.
2. Medicine Relating to or being surgery that is extreme or drastic in an effort to eradicate all existing or potential disease: radical hysterectomy.
3. Botany
a. Of, relating to, or arising from a root: radical hairs.
b. Arising from the base of a stem or from a below-ground stem or rhizome: radical leaves.

rad′i·cal·ly adv.
rad′i·cal·ness n.

radical

[rad′ikəl]
Etymology: L, radix, root
1 n, an atom or group of atoms that contains an unpaired electron. A radical does not exist freely in nature except for O2, NO, and NO2.
2 adj, pertaining to drastic therapy, such as the surgical removal of an organ, limb, or other part of the body.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl)
1. chemistry A group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (e.g., methyl, CH3); in chemical formulas, a radical is often distinguished by being enclosed in parentheses or brackets.
2. Directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process, e.g., a radical operation.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
4. Synonym(s): free radical.
[L. radix (radic-), root]

radical

(of plants) arising from the root or crown.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl)
1. In chemistry, a group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (e.g., methyl, CH3).
2. Thorough or extensive; relating or directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
[L. radix (radic-), root]

radical,

n 1. a group of atoms that acts together and forms a component of a compound. The group tends to remain bound together when a chemical reaction removes it from one compound and attaches it to another compound. A radical does not exist freely in nature.
adj 2. a drastic measure to cure or prevent the spread of a serious disease, such as the surgical removal of an organ, limb, or other body part.

radical

1. directed to the cause; going to the root or source of a morbid process.
2. a group of atoms that enters into and goes out of chemical combination without change and that forms one of the fundamental constituents of a molecule.

free radical
a radical, extremely reactive, and having a very short half-life (10−5 s or less in an aqueous solution), which carries an unpaired electron.
References in periodicals archive ?
To some, he remarked, his efforts to understand where the new radicalism came from would seem "an insidious attempt to discredit the ideas of radicals and reformers by 'psychologizing' them away" (p.
According to Helmuth Plessner, who introduced some important remarks on radicalism in his book The limits of community, this view may lead to a Manichaean image of reality (5).
This is the strongest condemnation yet from the MILF against the radicalism being spread by the Islamic State (IS)-inspired Maute and Abu Sayyaf groups in the Bangsamoro region.
Without addressing the root causes of radicalism, a society would have ongoing uphill battles against radicalism only using state power.
Only those clearly promoting radicalism consistently [will be blocked].
Without implying direct causality between unemployment and radicalism, it is nevertheless useful to remember that unemployment with some level of education was a common denominator for the majority of high-profile terrorists involved in what came to be called jihadist terrorism.
TRENDS Research & Advisory seeks a long-term solution for security and the establishment of peace in the GCC and the Middle East; eliminating extremism and radicalism which threatens the Arab world and its prosperity and competitiveness.
foreign policy success, said the president of the American University of Beirut Monday, arguing that the educational model contributed to fighting radicalism in the region.
Leader of the Democratic Union and MP Pavle Trajanov warned about the spreading of the Islamic radicalism on the Balkan and said that Macedonia's security is endangered by the religious radicalism.
In Radicalism: A Philosophical Study, Paul McLaughlin sets out to define radical political philosophy, to encourage mutual respect among radical political philosophers, and to defend a 'progressive and humanistic' political radicalism.
Varieties of Seventeenth- and Early Eighteenth-Century English Radicalism in Context.
Calls by Sunni Muslim clerics for a holy war against the Syrian government and its Shi'ite allies are fuelling radicalism in the region, a senior Iranian official said on Wednesday.