radical

(redirected from radicalism)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

radical

 [rad´ĭ-kal]
1. thorough or sweeping; directed to the cause or root of a morbid process.
2. a group of atoms that enters into and goes out of chemical combination without change and that forms one of the fundamental constituents of a molecule.
color radical chromophore.
free radical a radical that carries an unpaired electron; such radicals are extremely reactive, with a very short half-life.
oxygen radical a toxic metabolite of oxygen, such as superoxide or singlet oxygen, capable of damaging microorganisms and normal tissues.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl), Do not confuse this word with radicle.
1. In chemistry, a group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (for example, methyl, CH3); in chemical formulas, a radical is often distinguished by being enclosed in parentheses or brackets.
2. Thorough or extensive; relating or directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process; for example, a radical operation.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
4. Synonym(s): free radical
5. A functional group in a molecule or molecular entity.
[L. radix (radic-), root]

radical

/rad·i·cal/ (rad´ĭ-k'l)
1. directed to the root or cause; designed to eliminate all possible extensions of a morbid process.
2. a group of atoms that enters and goes out of chemical combination without change.

free radical  a radical that carries an unpaired electron; such radicals are extremely reactive, with a very short half-life.

radical

(răd′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Departing markedly from the usual or customary; extreme or drastic: a radical change in diet.
2. Medicine Relating to or being surgery that is extreme or drastic in an effort to eradicate all existing or potential disease: radical hysterectomy.
3. Botany
a. Of, relating to, or arising from a root: radical hairs.
b. Arising from the base of a stem or from a below-ground stem or rhizome: radical leaves.

rad′i·cal·ly adv.
rad′i·cal·ness n.

radical

[rad′ikəl]
Etymology: L, radix, root
1 n, an atom or group of atoms that contains an unpaired electron. A radical does not exist freely in nature except for O2, NO, and NO2.
2 adj, pertaining to drastic therapy, such as the surgical removal of an organ, limb, or other part of the body.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl)
1. chemistry A group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (e.g., methyl, CH3); in chemical formulas, a radical is often distinguished by being enclosed in parentheses or brackets.
2. Directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process, e.g., a radical operation.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
4. Synonym(s): free radical.
[L. radix (radic-), root]

radical

(of plants) arising from the root or crown.

rad·i·cal

(rad'i-kăl)
1. In chemistry, a group of elements or atoms usually passing intact from one compound to another, but usually incapable of prolonged existence in a free state (e.g., methyl, CH3).
2. Thorough or extensive; relating or directed to the extirpation of the root or cause of a morbid process.
3. Denoting treatment by extreme, drastic, or innovative, as opposed to conservative, measures.
[L. radix (radic-), root]

radical,

n 1. a group of atoms that acts together and forms a component of a compound. The group tends to remain bound together when a chemical reaction removes it from one compound and attaches it to another compound. A radical does not exist freely in nature.
adj 2. a drastic measure to cure or prevent the spread of a serious disease, such as the surgical removal of an organ, limb, or other body part.

radical

1. directed to the cause; going to the root or source of a morbid process.
2. a group of atoms that enters into and goes out of chemical combination without change and that forms one of the fundamental constituents of a molecule.

free radical
a radical, extremely reactive, and having a very short half-life (10−5 s or less in an aqueous solution), which carries an unpaired electron.
References in periodicals archive ?
General Martin Dempsey, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs, publicly excoriated LTC Dooley and characterized his course on Islamic Radicalism as "offensive to Muslims", and "against our values.
And visitors are invited to join The Nineteen Hundred and Eleven Party, set up by artists' group Dorothy to celebrate Liverpool's enduring desire for social justice and spirit of radicalism.
The study emphasises that any US counter-radicalisation strategy needs to be grounded in an understanding of the choice between targeting violent radicalism or 'cognitive radicalism', or broadly, the peaceful expression of radical ideas that may contribute to violence in the long run.
This volume of essays is an excellent resource for leaders, like me, who need thoughtful insights into the question of radicalism in our world today.
You are not alone in the struggle against terror and radicalism.
Any college-level library strong in global terrorism or world issues--or even Middle Eastern social issues--will find Islamic Radicalism and Global Jihad a fine study surveying Islamic radicalism and its relationship to terrorism and the West.
Summary: A new police-run program in the UK aimed at rooting out radicalism among Muslim youth identified hundreds of school children as "would-be terrorists," raising concern among Muslim
Paradoxically, it is in part because so many participants of that revolutionary year are still writing, within the academy and without, that the history of 1960s radicalism is still so fragmentary.
Even as it claimed to liberate the Arabs from imperialism, it deepened intellectual dependence upon the West's own romanticism and radicalism.
If we can all work together -- Afghanistan, Pakistan and also we must included India and the US and our allies -- I see now possibilties of moving beyond the day when one of us would need extremism or radicalism as an instrument of policy," Karzai said.
Mr Miliband reminds us that it was Labour's progressive radicalism that provided the engine room for change and then powered the Government to three successive victories.
This mixing of radicalism and the 'cult of genius' as seen in Byron and Shelley was a heady combination for a young girl on the edge.