radical surgery


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radical surgery

Etymology: L, radix, root; Gk, cheirourgia, surgery
surgery that is usually extensive and complex and intended to correct a severe health threat such as a rapidly growing cancer. See also radical dissection.

radical surgery

Surgery consisting of major excision or restructuring of a body region; RS is most often used aggressive or advanced cancer Examples 'Heroic' operations–eg, forequarter amputation, hindquarter amputation, hemipelvectomy, 'Commando' operation–radical neck. See Heroic surgery. Cf Palliative surgery.

radical surgery

Surgery to remove a large amount of damaged or neoplastic tissue and/or adjoining areas of lymphatic drainage to obtain a complete cure. This is in contrast to conservative surgery.
See also: surgery

radical surgery

Extensive and often mutilating surgery designed to remove all the diseased tissue, usually cancerous. From the Latin radix, a root.
References in periodicals archive ?
Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel plus platinum followed by radical surgery in early cervical cancer during pregnancy: three case reports.
Clinical examination combined with TUR-BT pathology determined that 3 patients had cT1 tumors, 9 patients had cT2, and 4 had >cT2 (3 had signs of genital organ involvement on positive bimanual exam and radiologic findings) disease prior to radical surgery.
Such side effects of radical surgery or external beam therapy as diarrhea, nausea, and skin breakdown are avoided, and the incidence of impotence is considerably less.
Part of Califano's radical surgery is campaign finance reform: "[A]s long as the big bucks are in treatment and the profits are in sick care, that's where members of Congress and influential lobbyists will center their efforts; there are precious few political contributions to be found in health promotion and disease prevention.
Kaufman and his colleagues at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston didn't want to jeopardize their patients' survival, but they did want to avoid radical surgery if possible.
The surgeon Ian Paterson, who ruined the lives of up to 1,000 people by carrying out unnecessary radical surgery, was reportedly motivated by money (Mirror, April 29).
We imposed a new bank levy and we're splitting them up, which is the most radical surgery to the banking system in the world.
During that time the grandmother-of-three has undergone radical surgery, numerous biopsies and countless check-ups.
Prior to this, patients whose bladder cancer was resistant to other treatments and were not fit enough for radical surgery had no other options available.
KENNY MILLER last night insisted Scotland need radical surgery to have any hope of reaching Euro 2012.