radical surgery


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radical surgery

Etymology: L, radix, root; Gk, cheirourgia, surgery
surgery that is usually extensive and complex and intended to correct a severe health threat such as a rapidly growing cancer. See also radical dissection.

radical surgery

Surgery consisting of major excision or restructuring of a body region; RS is most often used aggressive or advanced cancer Examples 'Heroic' operations–eg, forequarter amputation, hindquarter amputation, hemipelvectomy, 'Commando' operation–radical neck. See Heroic surgery. Cf Palliative surgery.

radical surgery

Surgery to remove a large amount of damaged or neoplastic tissue and/or adjoining areas of lymphatic drainage to obtain a complete cure. This is in contrast to conservative surgery.
See also: surgery

radical surgery

Extensive and often mutilating surgery designed to remove all the diseased tissue, usually cancerous. From the Latin radix, a root.
References in periodicals archive ?
Optimum treatment usually involves radical surgery and adjuvant therapy.
Such side effects of radical surgery or external beam therapy as diarrhea, nausea, and skin breakdown are avoided, and the incidence of impotence is considerably less.
Radical surgery suggests drastic alteration of every aspect of the provision of care and a detailed plan on how to accomplish this incredible feat.
The MRI-guided transrectal focal laser ablation represents a shift from radical surgery, providing effective therapy without sacrificing quality of life," says Dr.
We imposed a new bank levy and we're splitting them up, which is the most radical surgery to the banking system in the world.
At the 1st annual International Symposium, specialists reviewed the Mesothelioma And Radical Surgery (MARS) trial from the UK and unanimously concluded that patients with mesothelioma no longer should be subjected to lung-removing surgery (EPP) and that more symposia should be held to discuss and promote lung-sparing therapies.
During that time the grandmother-of-three has undergone radical surgery, numerous biopsies and countless check-ups.
Prior to this, patients whose bladder cancer was resistant to other treatments and were not fit enough for radical surgery had no other options available.
Five women will undergo the radical surgery within weeks ahead of a three-year-trial.
But this dreadful error shines a bright light on part of the NHS that needs radical surgery.
But it is no real victory for Mr Gardner as he has just heard the terrible news that the cancer may now have spread even though he underwent the trauma of radical surgery.