radiation dose


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radiation dose

1. Energy (joules) deposited by radiation in 1 kg of body tissue.
2. The exposure of a biological system to radiation, measured in rems or sieverts.
3. Radioactivity, measured in curies or becquerels.
4.
See: radiation absorbed dose
See also: dose
References in periodicals archive ?
During fluoroscopy procedures, surgeons use high levels of radiation so they can guide insertions within the body, producing highly localized radiation dose levels on the skin at the entry point, which can be a health risk.
This includes ensuring that we keep dose to the patient "As Low As Reasonably Achievable," otherwise known as ALARA, a guiding principle of clinical radiation use that requires the lowest radiation dose that will yield the most appropriate image quality for a particular patient to enable the correct clinical decision.
Radiation doses are greater in the air because at cruising altitude, there is less atmosphere to shield passengers and crew from cosmic radiation.
From these figure, it is observed that the value of storage modulus increases with radiation dose for all the samples excluding CPI-O/TPI-100.
It is possible to perform high-quality CT at a fraction of the radiation dose previously thought possible.
Let your health providers know you're concerned about radiation exposure, and make sure the lowest radiation dose is used.
She also said that HMC, keeping with international safety norms, had conducted regular survey for calculating and assessing radiation dose and safety, the effort she said has helped in better calibration of patient radiation dose and improved diagnostic examination and imaging at the hospitals.
2009) retrospectively looked at radiation doses for the 11 most common CT scans at four institutions in the San Francisco Bay area.
One of the reasons people say not to to get a virtual colonoscopy is because of radiation dose.
The ability to reduce the radiation dose for many women is another step forward for breast cancer screening with mammography, which saves thousands of lives each year," study's lead author R.
A number of medical institutions have recently assessed their medical staff's knowledge of radiation dose and its associated risk.
The three-year study revealed that overall, 68 per cent of the average radiation dose in Ireland comes from natural sources.

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