racism

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racism

A conscious or unconscious belief in the superiority of a particular race, which may lead to acts of discrimination and unequal treatment based on an individual’s skin colour or ethnic origin or identity.

ra·cism

(rā'sizm)
Attitudes, practices and other factors that discriminate against people because of their race, color, or ethnicity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nearly a decade ago the council said that a perceived increase in the number of racist incidents in Coventry's schools was down to them encouraging schools to record every incident.
There were times when I didn't want to leave the house after being branded a racist, but my family showed me great support that helped me through.
Following a complaint made by Sebastien to referee Howard Webb in Saturday's 4-3 win at Swansea, a man in the home section was arrested and later charged in relation to alleged racist abuse.
There is an under-reporting of racist crime and harassment in the city and this means we have not been able to support victims a dequately.
While Shetty, 31, was talking to the press, Lloyd - one of the celebrities accused of making racist comments about the Indian actress - burst into the room to ask for forgiveness.
Simpson and a white comedian's racist diatribe in a nightclub.
In his article "'The Race' to Win America" (August 7 issue), he cites the usual hypocrites, opportunists, and power brokers who spoke glowingly of the racist NCLR: men like Karl Rove, Bill Clinton, and New Mexico governor William Richardson.
I tend to ignore comments about the racist history of the [Mormon] church just as I tend to ignore the racist history of the original Christian/Colonial/ Anti-African racists that have never apologized for nor recanted their nearly 600 years of racial wrongdoing.
While national press coverage created an impression of a racist conspiracy to railroad innocent blacks, Blakeslee's richly detailed account shows the truth was both more complicated and simpler.
His reedy twang trembled, and he snarled with a noticeable lack of teleprompting, "You can call me anything you want, but do not call me a racist.
In representing the struggles of African American men to articulate their masculinity under extreme pressure, the novel also enacts Morrison's own struggle to articulate black masculinity in ways that reveal problems of patriarchal concepts of manhood without reproducing racist stereotypes.