raccoon

(redirected from raccoon rabies)
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raccoon

a gray-brown animal with a long, furry tail ringed with black, a sharp, pointed face, and about as big as a medium-sized dog. It is terrestrial, arboreal and aquatic, omnivorous and nocturnal. Called also coon, Procyon lotor.

raccoon dog
raccoon poxvirus
a poxvirus that causes typical pox lesions in the raccoon.
raccoon rabies
a major wildlife reservoir and source of human exposure in the southeastern United States.
raccoon roundworm
baylisascarisprocyonis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Spatiotemporal analysis of epizootic raccoon rabies propagation in Connecticut, 1991-1995.
The epizootiology of raccoon rabies in the eastern United States has been investigated in several states, including Virginia (11,12), Connecticut (13), and Maryland (14,15).
Although the raccoon rabies variant continued to spread throughout the state in the 1990s, the annual number of raccoons testing positive for rabies decreased from 2,318 in 1993 to 691 in 1998.
The epidemiologic description is intended medical practitioners and public health officials in reducing the incidence of domestic animal exposure to rabid animals and thus in minimizing the need for P communities affected by the raccoon rabies epizootic.
They find that raccoon rabies could spread throughout the state in just three years.
Through monoclonal antibody studies, the virus was found to be a strain of raccoon rabies.
Raccoon rabies virus variant transmission through solid organ transplantation.
There has only been one human case of raccoon rabies, a man in Virginia, in 15 years.
On August 27, 2009, a sick raccoon collected from Central Park in Manhattan tested positive for rabies virus, marking the emergence of an enzootic of raccoon rabies in Central Park.
20 /PRNewswire/ -- Rabies cases in Pennsylvania fell 13 percent in 2003 as a result of the Oral Raccoon Rabies Vaccination (ORV) Program, Pennsylvania Agriculture Secretary Dennis C Wolf said today.
However, the survey did document interstate travel of captive deer, which raises concern for the possible translocation of a raccoon rabies virus variant across oral rabies vaccination boundaries.