rabbit

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Related to rabbiter: Yacker

antithymocyte globulin (rabbit)

a purified gamma globulin obtained from rabbits immunized with human thymocytes; it is administered intravenously in the treatment of acute rejection occurring after renal transplantation.
Infectious disease An animal of the class Leporidae that may carry various pathogens: Brucella suis biotype 2, Cheyletiella infestation, Francisella tularensis, plague, Q-fever, Trichophyton

rabbit


brush rabbit
sylvilagusbachmani.
rabbit calicivirus disease
rabbit fever
rabbit fibroma virus
see leporipoxvirus, Shope rabbit fibroma.
rabbit fur mite
cheyletiellaparasitivorax.
laboratory rabbit
some specialized strains have been developed to provide a consistent type of rabbit for experimental work in laboratories. The International Index of Laboratory Animals is a reference source for these strains. The most commonly used variety is the new zealand White.
rabbit pasteurellosis
see rabbit septicemia (below).
rabbit pox
pygmy rabbit
Brachylagus idahoensis; a native of North America.
rock rabbit
Ochotona princeps; see pika.
rabbit septicemia
a disease of rabbits caused by Pasteurella multocida and characterized by sudden death preceded by fever, dyspnea and nasal discharge. In mild cases there is nasal catarrh and conjunctivitis. Called also snuffles (1).
rabbit syphilis
see spirochetosis (2).
rabbit tick
haemaphysalisleporispalustris.
volcano rabbit
Romerolagus diazi; a native of Mexico.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wright's brother Robert remarked in later years of David's abilities: 'Needless to say, he knew as little about practical life as Shelley or Byron and cared as little; and all the engineering ever came to was to teach him to pitch a tent and boil a billy and live the life of a rabbiter in the backblocks.
Presence and company, alongside absence and solitude, and easeful range of reference are coming together here in Baxter's distinct articulation, but this is itself an expression of 'shared' solitude: the paradox emphasises both the solitariness of the poet (like Wordsworth looking on the Highland girl) and the community of others--friends, but also family, tribal, national, or simply human characters of all kinds, from rabbiters to poets.
She added: "I have brought in rabbiters and they tell me that they can't get enough of them in places like Leeds, Middlesbrough and Hull.