quinidine


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Related to quinidine: quinine, Quinidine sulfate

quinidine

 [kwin´ĭ-dēn]
the dextrorotatory isomer of quinine, administered orally as the gluconate, polygalacturonate, or sulfate salts, or intravenously as the gluconate salt in treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. It is also administered intravenously as the gluconate salt in the treatment of life-threatening malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum.

quin·i·dine

(kwin'i-dēn, -din),
One of the alkaloids of cinchona, a stereoisomer of quinine (the C-9 epimer); used as an antimalarial; also used in the treatment of atrial fibrillation and flutter, and paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia.
Synonym(s): conquinine

quinidine

/quin·i·dine/ (kwin´ĭ-dēn) the dextrorotatory isomer of quinine, used in the form of the gluconate, polygalacturonate, and sulfate salts in the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias; also used in the treatment of severe falciparum malaria.

quinidine

(kwĭn′ĭ-dēn′)
n.
A bitter alkaloid, C20H24N2O2, that is a stereoisomer of quinine, used in the form of its salts to treat malaria and certain cardiac arrhythmias.

quinidine

[kwin′ədēn, -din]
an antiarrhythmic agent administered as a bisulfate, gluconate, or polygalacturonate or as sulfate salts.
indications It is prescribed in the treatment of atrial flutter, atrial fibrillation, premature ventricular contractions, and tachycardias.
contraindications Known hypersensitivity to this drug prohibits its use. It is contraindicated in thrombocytopenia, myasthenia gravis, and some arrhythmias, particularly those associated with heart block.
adverse effects Among the most serious adverse effects are cardiac arrhythmia, hypertension, and cinchonism. Rare but potentially fatal hypersensitivity reactions such as anaphylaxis and thrombocytopenia may occur. Diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting are common.

quinidine

Duraquin®, Quinaglute® Cardiology A class Ia antiarhythmic that ↓ myocardial excitability, conduction velocity, and contractility. See Therapeutic drug monitoring.

quin·i·dine

(kwin'i-dēn)
A cinchona alkaloid; used as an antimalarial and to treat atrial fibrillation and flutter.
Synonym(s): conquinine.

quinidine

A drug derived from QUININE and used to control irregularity or excessive rapidity of the heart beat by depressing the excitability of the muscle. The drug is on the WHO official list. A brand name is Kinidin Durules.

quinidine

the dextrorotatory isomer of quinine, used in treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Several salts are used, including the gluconate, sulfate and bisulfate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because quinidine inhibits CYP2D6, use caution when prescribing and monitoring other medications metabolized by this pathway.
The 93 patients randomized to the investigational treatment started on 20 mg dextromethorphan and 10 mg quinidine administered orally once daily for a week, followed by an up-titration schedule over a period of 2 weeks to reach 30 mg dextromethorphan twice daily plus 10 mg quinidine twice daily, the dosage they continued for an additional 7 weeks.
Despite availability of the dextromethorphan plus quinidine formulation, clinicians should avoid using it to treat agitation in Alzheimer's disease patients until data become available from phase III studies that involve at least 6 months of chronic therapy, Dr.
Treatment with quinidine gluconate of persons with severe plasmodium falciparum infection: discontinuation of parenteral quinine.
Many of the drugs that were initially known to prolong the QT interval were antiarrhythmics, and quinidine was the most commonly implicated agent.
Molecular docking of cryptotanshinone, dihydrotanshinone, tanshinone I, tanshinone IIA dextromethorphan, quinidine to CYP2D6 was performed using the three dimensional (3-D) crystal structure of substrate free CYP2D6 (PDB code 2F9Q) obtained from the Protein Data Bank (Rowland et al.
Musks and the P-gp inhibitor reference compounds quinidine and verapamil caused a dose-dependent increase in accumulation of rhodamine B in mussel gill tissue, indicating an inhibition of efflux transporter activity.
It has been established that the active principles, unlike quinidine and some other anti-arrhythmic substances, do not contain nitrogen in their structures.
In addition, even before gestation occurred, the mother developed an anxiety disorder from spousal abuse, which resulted in frequent, premature beats requiring treatment with oral quinidine.
In addition to the numerous relatively new or investigational agents such as ibutilide and dofetilide there are at least 7 agents commonly used for either conversion or MSR: quinidine, disopyramide, procainamide, flecainide, propafenone, amiodarone, and sotalol.
Interestingly, while almost all of the drugs listed have been replaced by more effective remedies, some, such as atropine, digitalis, chloral hydrate, codeine, and quinidine, are still used today.