quinacrine


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Related to quinacrine: mepacrine

quinacrine

 [kwin´ah-krin]
an anthelmintic and antiprotozoal agent used especially for treatment of malaria, giardiasis, and tapeworm infestations. It is a yellow fluorescent dye also used in chromosome banding.

quinacrine

/quin·a·crine/ (kwin´ah-krin) an antimalarial, antiprotozoal, and anthelmintic, used as the hydrochloride salt, especially for suppressive therapy of malaria and in the treatment of giardiasis and tapeworm infestations.

quinacrine

(kwĭn′ə-krēn′)
n.
A compound, C23H30ClN3O, administered in its hydrochloride form, that was formerly used as an antimalarial and antihelminthic drug and, in some countries, has been used as an agent for the nonsurgical sterilization of women.

quinacrine

Classic cytogenetics A fluorescent dye used to stain chromosomes, especially Y chromosome Gynecology Tropical medicine An antiparasitic agent once used to manage giardiasis, helminths, malaria, protozoa, tapeworms

quinacrine

A yellow acridine dye useful in studying chromosomal structure because of its property of fluorescing when bound to certain regions of chromosomes. Also known as mepacrine. Quinacrine was once widely used to prevent malaria and to remove tapeworms.

quinacrine (kwin´əkrēn, -krin),

n an anthelmintic and antiprotozoal agent used to treat giardiasis and tapeworm infections. It is not effective in treating malaria.

quinacrine

an antimalarial, antiprotozoal and anthelmintic used especially for suppressive therapy of malaria in humans and also in the treatment of giardiasis in dogs. Called also mepacrine.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends tinidazole, metronidazole, quinacrine, albendazole, or nitazoxanide to treat giardiasis; however, it doesn't indicate a preference for 1 medicine over another.
Geschwind is conducting a trial of quinacrine, an old malaria drug that showed promise clearing prions from a model of the disease created in a laboratory dish.
From experiments with cell cultures, they found that both quinacrine (a malaria drug) and chlorpromazine (Thorazine, an antipsychotic agent) showed substantial anti-prion properties at concentrations that were safe in humans.
Since quinacrine was banned in India as a non-surgical method for female sterilisation due to safety and efficacy doubts, its dwindling supporters have been looking for an alternative.
A new consistent chromosome abnormality in chronic myelogenous leukemia identified by quinacrine fluorescence and Giemsa staining.
For example in India, women's groups have used public interest litigation to ban harmful trials of injectable contraception and introduction of the female sterilisation drug, Quinacrine.
Preliminary trials using quinacrine in patients with both new variant CJD and sporadic CJD apparently reduced symptoms early in treatment but failed to cure the disease (Wilson, 2002).
Plaquenil [R]) Retinal damage is Chloroquine Aralen [R]) Hydroxycholoroquine rare when the and chloroquine patient is Quinacrine may cause a monitored closely.
A new consistent chromosomal abnormality in chronic myelogenous leukemia identified by quinacrine fluorescence and Giemsa staining.
Before her death in December 2001, Rachel was put on the revolutionary drug quinacrine - an anti-malaria remedy pioneered in America.
The method involves transcervical insertion of two doses of quinacrine pellets, one month apart, between days seven and 10 of the menstrual cycle.