finding of fact

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finding of fact

A formal decision by a Fitness to Practise Panel appointed by the UK’s General Medical Council (GMC) to hear a case regarding a doctor's ability (fitness) to practise without restriction, whether or not the alleged facts have been proved.
References in periodicals archive ?
dissenting) (juries should decide every question of fact, but are prohibited from deciding questions of law), and Amar 8c Hirsch, supra note 37, at 98-100 (allowing juries to decide questions of law would usurp the powers of the court); see also Fed.
56) But determining such questions of legislative intent--which courts sometimes refer to as "legislative fact"--is considered Part of law interpretation and is not treated as a question of fact.
Whether an expense is "primarily" for medical care is a question of fact.
The Court found that there is a question of fact, which must be decided as the case proceeds, as to whether the DMCA applies to protect Napster.
In addition, the tenant had made an insufficient showing that any question of fact exists as to reasonableness of the landlord's attorney's fees.
What it did say is that would be determined as a question of fact in front of this court and in the appellate process.
Whether a bad debt is business or nonbusiness is a question of fact.
The court acknowledged the plaintiff's contention that the question of whether an accountant owed a duty to a third party was in part a question of fact to be decided by a jury.
The determination of reasonable arm's-length prices, while necessarily somewhat subjective, is nevertheless a question of fact, and therefore the situation of each taxpayer must be examined on its own particular circumstances and merits.
In addition, the Federal Circuit affirmed the patent's validity and has returned the case to the District Court for determination of a question of fact.
However, it is a question of fact whether payments an employee receives from the employer (under an employment contract or otherwise) are attributable to the employee's transfer of all substantial rights to a patent (or an undivided interest therein) or are compensation for services rendered.
Whether the meals were furnished for the employer's convenience, and are therefore excludable under section 119, is a question of fact.